“Ye are many—they are few”: Exploring the Peterloo massacre through our library resources

Next year on this day, 16th August, it will be the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre. The ironic name given to events at St Peter’s Fields in Manchester on 16th August 1819 when the cavalry charged into a peaceful crowd of 50,000-80,000 people who were attending a mass demonstration for political reform. Between 10-20 people were killed and 100s were injured. In this week’s blog post I have pulled together just a small selection of Library resources, digital and physical, that will help you explore Peterloo, the events leading up to it and the aftermath.

The Massacre of Peterloo. George Cruikshank [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The 19th century was a period of huge economic, social, political and idealogical changes. Post the Napoleonic Wars, which ended just four years before Peterloo (“Peterloo” a play on Waterloo), demands for political reform were growing. Industrial cities such as Manchester had no representation in Parliament,only relatively small numbers of wealthy male citizens were eligible to vote and working and economic conditions were incredibly poor. Campaigns for parliamentary reform became more strident and found growing levels of support, political radicalism in the UK was on the rise. Continue reading

On trial: Sabin Americana, 1500-1926

Thanks to a request from staff in HCA I’m pleased to let you know that the Library currently has trial access to Sabin Americana, 1500-1926 from Gale Cengage. This is an expansive and comprehensive collection of works written or published in the United States, as well as items printed elsewhere, that document the history of the Americas over more than 400 years. The database is based on Joseph Sabin’s famed bibliography Bibliotheca Americana.

You can access this online resource via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 10th April 2018.

[Screenshot from] Galv~ao, António. The discoveries of the world from their first originall vnto the yeere of our Lord 1555. Londini, 1601. 107pp. Sabin Americana. Gale, Cengage Learning. 14 March 2018

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Explore black history through Archives Unbound

With our current trials to online primary source databases African American Newspapers and Black Newspaper Collection (and Black History Month in the U.S. just ended) I wanted to highlight a number of primary source databases that you already have access to at the University that allow you to discover more about black history.

I’m concentrating on collections available to you through Archives Unbound, which presents topically-focused digital collections of historical documents. There are currently 265 collections in Archives Unbound covering a broad range of topics from the Middle Ages forward-from Witchcraft to World War II to 20th century political history.

You can access Archives Unbound via the Databases A-Z list or Primary Sources database list.

As Archives Unbound covers such a vast range of subjects and collections, searching through the whole database will provide material perhaps from some surprising areas (so it’s very worthwhile doing this), however, I’m going to focus on some of the individual collections. You can access the individual collections by clicking on “Browse Collections”, where you can either browse through an alphabetical list or choose to browse by “Categories” instead.

So here is just a small selection of collections that will allow you to take your research into black history further.

Fannie Lou Hamer: Papers of a Civil Rights Activist, Political Activist, and Woman

Fannie Lou Hamer (née Townsend) was born in Mississippi in 1917. The youngest of 20 children she would go on to become an American voting rights activist and a leader in the Civil Rights Movement. Hamer was instrumental in organising Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). She was actively involved in starting the Delta Ministry, and she was one of the founders of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party later to become the Vice-Chair. Continue reading

#100years: “Because…we want to get on with our work more quickly”

This was the response from suffragist, Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett, when asked why women would want the vote1.

Today, 6th February 2018, marks 100 years since (some) British women were granted the right to vote for the first time through the Representation of the People Act. This was the culmination of a hard fought campaign and while it would take another 10 years before women would have equal voting rights to men in the UK, with the Representation of the People Act 1928, it was a victory for the suffragette movement.

There are lots of events, exhibitions, programmes, etc., taking place today and this year to mark this important historic event but I wanted to delve into some of the primary sources available to us at the Library which allow you to find out more about the suffragette movement in the UK.

What did the papers say?

The Library subscribes to a large number of online newspaper archives that will allow you to see what events were being reported on at the time and how they were being reported. Read full text articles, compare how different newspapers were covering the same issues and stories, track coverage from the start of the suffragette movement in the 19th century up to the Representation of the People Act 1918 and beyond.

Screenshot from UK Press Online showing the front page of the Daily Express from Thursday February 7, 1918.

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Discovery Day – find your way round our digital primary sources

Working on your dissertation and looking for primary source material? Looking to incorporate digitised primary sources into your teaching? Wanting to expand your research with digital resources? Or just have no idea what primary source material might be available to you at the Library?

The Library’s very first Discovery Day, on Tuesday 30th January, may be exactly what you are looking for.

We invite you to the 1st floor, Main Library on Tuesday 30th Jan between 10am-3pm where representatives from 3 of the major publishers of digitised primary source collections, Adam Matthew, Gale Cengage and ProQuest, and our very own Centre for Research Collections (CRC), will be on hand to help students and staff navigate through and find useful material in the huge range of primary sources we have access to online at the Library. Continue reading

Spotlight on Adam Matthew digital primary sources

On Tuesday 30th January we’ll be holding a Discovery Day event in the Main Library where representatives from 3 publishers of digitised primary source collections and our very own Centre for Research Collections will be on hand to help you navigate through and find useful material in the huge range of primary sources you have access to at the Library. Adam Matthew are one of the publishers who will be attending and this blog post highlights the fantastic collections the Library has access to through them.

The Library has access to a large and broad range of digital primary source collections that can be accessed via the Primary Source database list (see also the separate lists for Newspapers & Magazines and Images & Moving Images).

Adam Matthew are a publisher who specialise in producing high-quality, digitised primary source collections online. They put together thematic collections sourced from libraries, archives, museums, etc., around the world and they have databases that cover the Medieval period onwards.

The Library is very lucky to have access to 11 of these collections (or databases) from Adam Matthew and all can be accessed via the Primary Source database list.

China: Culture and Society

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Trial access: Church Missionary Society Periodicals Module 2

*The Library has since purchased this resource and it can be accessed, along with Church Missionary Society Periodicals, module 1, via the Primary Sources database list or Databases A-Z list.*

The Library currently has access for a trial period to Church Missionary Society Periodicals Module 2: medical journals, Asian missions and the Historical Record, 1816-1986 from Adam Matthew Digital.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 14th March 2017.
** Trial access has been extended until 5th April 2017**

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ProQuest e-resources trials extended!

The Library currently has trial access to several fantastic databases from ProQuest and I’m happy to let you know our access to these databases has recently been extended until the end of December 2016.

The databases included are:

  • Women’s Magazine Archive I and II
  • British Periodicals III and IV
  • Los Angeles Times Historical Archive, 1881-1992
  • News, Policy and Politics Magazine Archive
  • Luthers Werke
  • Historic Literary Criticism.

You can access all of these trial databases via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends on 31st December 2016.

womens-magazine-archive Continue reading

Trial access to magazine and periodical archives

The Library currently has trial access to 3 magazine and periodical archives, British Periodicals III and IV, News, Policy & Politics Magazine Archive and Women’s Magazine Archive I and II. These give access to a wide range of full-text magazines from around the early 20th century onwards including The Tatler, The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, Chatelaine, Newsweek, The Sketch, Good Housekeeping, Seventeen and Cosmopolitan.

You can access all of these online resources via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends on 30th November 2016.
**Trial has now been extended until 31st December 2016**

Women’s Magazine Archive I and II

womens-magazine-archive Continue reading