Resource Lists: new list view

New List view

We’ve changed the default view of Resource Lists so when you go to a Resource List you’ll see the section headings listed instead of all the citations.

We think this will make it easier for students to find the relevant readings for their week or topic of study and, as there are fewer citations in a section, it will load quicker than a full list.

Toggle to expand or collapse your Resource List

You may have noticed this toggle icon at the top of your Resource List .

This icon allows you to collapse and expand your Resource List and toggle between two views:

  1. Sections headings (‘collapsed’ view)
  2. Full list view

The collapsed view looks like this:

The ‘collapsed’ list view displays section headings and shows the number of citations in each section. To view the items in the section click on the heading. Click on the heading again to close the section.

To expand the list and see all the citations on the list click on the toggle icon .

Student help

There is a short video and guide for students highlighting some key features which will help them use their Resource Lists. Students can find the guide and video under the ‘Useful Links’ on their Resource Lists.

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New E-Resource – Jutastat

Following a successful trial earlier this year, we now subscribe to Justastat. Content in Jutastat includes:

  • Namibia Law Reports, Statutes of Namibia,
  • South African Law Reports from 1947 to date and South African case law from 1838, South African Statutes,
  • Tanzania Law Reports, Statutes of Tanzania,
  • Zambia Law Reports, Statutes of Zambia,
  • Zimbabwe Law Reports, Statutes of Zimbabwe,

Juta’s online journal content:

  • Acta Juridica
  • Annual Survey of SA Law
  • South African Law Journal
  • South African Journal of Criminal Justice
  • South African Mercantile Law Journal
  • Stellenbosch Law Review
  • Tydskrif vir die Suid Afrikaanse Reg / Journal of South African Law

Subject coverage includes administrative, civil procedure, commercial, constitutional, criminal, intellectual property, international, labour, mining, revenue and shipping law.

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Edinburgh Research Archive Statistics: July 2019

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Ban Dainagon Ekotob : a premium replica of the late 12th-century Japanese emakimono (picture scroll)

The Library has just purchased a beautiful reproduction of a late 12th-century Japanese emakimono (絵巻) – a set of 3 illustrated narrative picture scrolls called Ban Dainagon Ekotob (伴大納言絵詞 The Tale of Great Minister Ban). The full-colour painting depicts the events of the Ōtemmon Conspiracy, an event of Japan’s early Heian period. The painting, attributed to Tokiwa Mitsunaga, is over 20 m (66 ft) long and about 31.5 cm (12.4 in) tall. The original art work is considered to be Kokuhō (國寶, or a Japanese national treasure) among six such rare and invaluable picture scrolls. Information about their replica can be found here.

The reproduction was published by Chikuma shobo (筑摩書房) in 1971-1974 in a limited edition of 1000 copies. Our Library copy has the set number ’84’. The 3 hand-scrolls are placed individually in 3 wooden cases, each accompanied with a booklet. The set has been catalogued for the Centre for Research Collections. See the bibliographic record in DiscoverEd here.

The material has been purchased in response to needs for a Japanese Studies course called “Supernatural Japan: doing Japanology through Yokai”. As the course takes a ‘learning by doing’ approach, allowing students to experience Yokai in art, literature to discover the historical and cultural value of Yokai in Japanese society, this set of 3 hand-scrolls will give a rare opportunity of authentic reading experience for students of Japanese Studies or anyone interested in Japanese art, history and culture.

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The Edinburgh School of Social Study and Training

Foundations:

Social work training at the University of Edinburgh has gone through several guises since it was first taught in 1918.  Initially it was established as the Edinburgh School of Social Study and Training, under the auspices of the University of Edinburgh.  The School was established to meet the increasing need for trained social workers, in the broad sense of the term, which had been highlighted during the First World War.  A number of civic minded citizens, including several University of Edinburgh lecturers, came together to form an Association for the Promotion of Social Study and Training in 1917.  The School began teaching students in 1918.  The School operated as a separate body until it amalgamated with the University in 1928 to become the Department of Social Studies and Training.  Archival material gives us rich insights into these early years, and the work that was done to keep the School running and demonstrate that training for social work was both feasible and worthy of association with the University.

Theoretical and Practical training:

The first lecture of the Edinburgh School of Social Study  and Training was given by Miss M. T. Rankin on the subject of ‘Social Economics’ on 8th January 1918  at 4.15pm in the Mathematical Institute, 16 Chambers Street (shown opposite).

The lecture series for the term also included ‘Social Ethics’ and ‘Personal and Public Hygiene’. Students could enrol for the full 2-year Diploma Course or attend individual classes, with public lectures also being given on topics such as ‘The Nature and Duties of Citizenship’ and ‘The Co-operative Movement in Edinburgh’.  By 1927 the curriculum had expanded to include, among others, courses in Elementary Anatomy and Physiology, Social Psychology, Office Work and Moral Philosophy.  As well as attending theoretical courses students undertook practical training for 3 days each week working in a variety of settings for example day nurseries, juvenile and adult courts, the Craiglockhart Poorhouse, and the Welfare Department of the North British Rubber Works.  Additional visits were organised to factories, hospitals and public health departments.

 

Student and their career prospects: 

Initially numbers enrolling in the School were small, but they gradually grew from 11 full time students in 1918 to 34 in 1927.  The School was training its students for social work, but at this time the field encompassed much broader roles that it does today, including jobs such as Factory Inspectors, Welfare Workers, Labour Organisers and House Management Workers.  Archival material notes that former students went on to have careers in a variety of roles such as the Maternity and Child Welfare Visitor, Stockton-On-Tees; the Industrial Secretary of the YMCA, China; the Police Court Missionary and Probation Officer at Marlborough Street Police Court, London; and the Assistant Welfare Worker in Fry’s Chocolate and Cocoa Works. As well as providing training for social workers the School offered a Health Visitor’s Probation Certificate, which was awarded to 132 students.  Archival material also shows that the School was also approached to offer various forms of training and lectures to other groups including disabled officers following the First World War, Women Police Officers and the Edinburgh Women Citizens’ Association.

 

Amalgamation with the University:

The Director of the School, Miss Nora Milnes, and the wider Executive Committee of the School were keen that the School and its students be afforded academic recognition on a par with the other social studies courses being run at Universities around the UK.  The School quickly began setting out its case for its relationship with the University to become more integrated.  This was achieved in 1928 when the University Court agreed to the proposed amalgamation and the School became the Department of Social Studies and Training.  Announcing the amalgamation in the 1928 Annual Report Nora Milnes notes that:

“the change which is now to take place is the best proof of the success of the School.  Social Study has won for itself a recognised position not only in the University, but also in the City of Edinburgh.”

 

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Edinburgh Research Explorer Statistics: July 2019

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New to the Library: Archives of Sexuality & Gender

I’m really pleased to let you know that the Library now has access to the Archives of Sexuality & Gender. Spanning the 16th to the 20th century it is the largest digital collection of primary source materials relating to the history and study of sex, sexuality and gender. Documentation covering social, political, health and legal issues impacting LGBTQ communities around the world is included, as well as rare and unique books on sex and sexuality from the sciences to the humanities.

You can access Archives of Sexuality & Gender via the Databases A-Z list and the Primary Sources database list. Access via DiscoverEd will also soon be possible. Read More

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New to the Library: Women’s Magazine Archive

I’m happy to let you know that the Library now has access to the Women’s Magazine Archive, Collection I and II from ProQuest, a searchable archive of leading women’s interest magazines, dating from the 19th century through to the 21st.

You can access the Women’s Magazine Archive via the Databases A-Z list or the Newspapers and Magazines database list. You can also access the individual magazine titles via DiscoverEd.

Consumer magazines aimed at a female readership are recognised as critical primary sources through which to interpret multiple aspects of 19th and 20th-century history and culture. Archival issues, however, have previously been difficult to locate and navigate. Read More

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‘Body Language’ exhibition launches to resounding gong!

Project archivist, Elaine MacGillivray, dances us through the magic of the ‘Body Language’ exhibition launch.

Image showing 'Body Language' Exhibition opening times

‘Body Language’ Exhibition opening times

A sudden booming and magical gong hushed invited guests.  Its exotic timbre reverberated throughout the polished black granite, double-height, library foyer.  Chatting paused…drinks suspended.  All eyes turned to the small company of ‘MSc Dance Science and Education’ student dancers as they weaved their way through the standing audience to centre stage. Simple costumes of black leotards and tights were the perfect portal to an emotive and hypnotic choreography.  The audience was transported, invited to come along on a wonderful journey of movement in space and time, as the dancers responded to the percussive gong.  Finally, as the vibrations of the last gong strike gradually faded away, the audience applause occupied the vacancy.  This is how to launch an exhibition.

Last Thursday (25 July 2019) students past and present, academics, professional support staff, volunteers, senior university staff and project partners came together to preview and celebrate the launch of the Wellcome Trust funded archive exhibition ‘Body Language’.  Guests, from all over Scotland, were welcomed by Head of Special Collections and the Centre for Research Collections, Dr Joseph Marshall.  This was followed by opening speeches from Wendy Timmons, Programme Director, MSc Dance Science and Education at the University of Edinburgh, and then from Professor John Ravenscroft, Chair of Childhood Visual Impairment at Moray House School of Education.

The exhibition was declared open and dancers continued to move throughout the exhibition space, responding to percussive instruments, as guests enjoyed their preview exploration of the exhibition.  We were treated to a visual feast of contemporary dance inspired by learning from the (very) tangible past.  The dance students choreographed their work as a creative response to the film ‘The Gong’.  ‘The Gong’ film illustrates dance teaching at Dunfermline College of Physical Education in the 1960s (which included aesthetic and dramatic forms) and is featured in the exhibition.

University of Edinburgh Main Library Exhibition Gallery: 'Body Language' exhibition

University of Edinburgh Main Library Exhibition Gallery: ‘Body Language’ exhibition

The ‘Body Language’ exhibition offers a unique insight into the work and life of Scottish female pioneers in movement, dance and physical education.  We discover this through the archive collections of Dunfermline College of Physical Education (one of the first training colleges for female physical education teachers); Scottish Gymnastics (and its predecessors), and Margaret Morris (1891-1980).  The exhibition features film, photographic images, textiles, printed works and manuscripts from across these three archive collections. The archive collections of Dunfermline College of Physical Education and Scottish Gymnastics are held at the Centre for Research Collections at the University of Edinburgh.  The Margaret Morris collection is held by our project partner, Culture Perth and Kinross, at their Fergusson Gallery in Perth.

The University of Edinburgh’s Main Library Exhibition Gallery buzzed with the chatter of guests, as members of Dunfermline College of Physical Education Old Students’ Association mingled with archive cataloguing project volunteers, current students with professional and curatorial staff, and academics with dancers.  Guests chuckled and nodded in agreement as Professor Ravenscroft compared a visit to the archives to that of a visit to Narnia. We agree that the archives are magical: a treasure chest, full to overflowing, with knowledge, ideas, learning and inspiration.  The curation and staging of this exhibition is the culmination of months, if not years, of collaborative work involving archivists, curators, academics and project partners.  But it is really only the beginning.  The seed has now been planted, from which will grow a range public engagement activities with a variety of communities; academic research, and an enhanced student experience. It is a shining example of how archive collections can inform, inspire, encourage and facilitate inter-disciplinary working, research and creative engagement.

Disclaimer: whilst we agree with Professor Ravenscroft that like Narnia, archives are magical, we must make absolutely clear that they are not fictional, and you definitely cannot access them via the back of your wardrobe.  We know, we checked.  You can however, get yourself along to the University of Edinburgh’s Main Library Exhibition Gallery to experience for yourself the magic of the ‘Body Language’ exhibition.  It’s free and you don’t even need a ticket!

‘Body Language’ runs from 26 July – 26 October 2019 at the University of Edinburgh Main Library Exhibition Gallery, George Square, Edinburgh.  The exhibition is open from Mon-Sat, 10am-5pm, with Sunday opening included in August. The exhibition forms part of the University of Edinburgh’s Exhibition programme as well as the Edinburgh Festival Fringe programme. You can view the student performance from the exhibition launch event here.

Elaine MacGillivray, project archivist.

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New to the Library: The New Republic Archive

I’m pleased to let you know that through the Saunders endowment for North American history the Library has been able to purchase The New Republic Magazine Archive from EBSCOhost. This digital archive offers a searchable full-text backfile of all issues of The New Republic from 1914 onwards.

You can access The New Republic Magazine Archive  via DiscoverEd. You will also soon be able to access it via the Databases A-Z list or the Newspapers and Magazines database list. Read More

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Default utility Image The Edinburgh School of Social Study and Training Foundations: Social work training at the University of Edinburgh has gone through several guises since...
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