New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester one, 2017/18 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

Controlling capital: public and private regulation of financial markets edited by Nicholas Dorn (shelfmark: K1066 Con. Also available as e-book).

The rise of the outsiders: how mainstream politics lost its way by Steve Richards (shelfmark: JC423 Ric.)

Energy politics and rural development in Sub-Saharan Africa: the case of Ghana by Naaborle Sackeyfio (e-book).

Decolonizing anthropology: moving further toward an anthropology for liberation edited by Faye V. Harrison (shelfmark: GN345 Dec.)

Transforming patriarchy: Chinese families in the twenty-first century edited by Gonçalo Santos and Stevan Harrell (shelfmark: HQ684 Tra. Also available as e-book).

Residential child and youth care in a developing world. 1, Global perspectives 1 edited by Tuhinul Islam and Leon Fulcher (shelfmark: HV862 Res.) Read More

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Spotlight on Adam Matthew digital primary sources

On Tuesday 30th January we’ll be holding a Discovery Day event in the Main Library where representatives from 3 publishers of digitised primary source collections and our very own Centre for Research Collections will be on hand to help you navigate through and find useful material in the huge range of primary sources you have access to at the Library. Adam Matthew are one of the publishers who will be attending and this blog post highlights the fantastic collections the Library has access to through them.

The Library has access to a large and broad range of digital primary source collections that can be accessed via the Primary Source database list (see also the separate lists for Newspapers & Magazines and Images & Moving Images).

Adam Matthew are a publisher who specialise in producing high-quality, digitised primary source collections online. They put together thematic collections sourced from libraries, archives, museums, etc., around the world and they have databases that cover the Medieval period onwards.

The Library is very lucky to have access to 11 of these collections (or databases) from Adam Matthew and all can be accessed via the Primary Source database list.

China: Culture and Society

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An insight into Joseph Joachim’s life and work – Sarah and Devon’s experiences as CRC interns

Earlier this year, our two interns Sarah and Devon spent a few months re-housing and listing the papers of the Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim (1831-1907), recently donated to the CRC. They share their experiences with us.

Sarah Hendriks:

When I was about eight years old my violin teacher gave me a new piece of music and said, ‘now you get to play a real piece’. It was Joachim’s Hungarian Dance No. 4 and I loved it. It’s remained one of my favourite pieces to play and its folksy, vibrant style inspired my later love of other composers like Bloch and Kreisler.

Despite loving his music, I knew relatively little about Joachim the man until I took on this internship at Special Collections. By going through the collection I discovered so much about Joachim, his family, his music, and his life. I also got to meet his relatives and talk about the collection and hear their recollections of the items. Matching the stories to the items I’d been reading and examining for the last two months reinforced the human aspect of the material I’d been working with: such a rare experience!

Over the last three months I’ve catalogued what feels like hundreds of newspaper clippings, notes, concert programmes, photographs, and music. I’ve had the chance to brush up my German whilst reading the mountain of obituaries and anecdotes about him, his violins and his performances. There were also notes about his life in Hungarian and a poem in French on the occasion of his death. Buried amongst the newspaper clippings was a handwritten account of a family holiday: I’d never read a more touching portrait of the man.

Postcard of Joseph Joachim in a fake car with the Mendelssohn brothers, 1890-1907 (Coll-1711/5/5)

The highlights for me, however, were the photographs. Joachim apparently loved a joke and you can see this in the picture of him in a fake car. The images also captured his pensive side, reading his letters in front of a fire or concentrating on some German verse. A particularly special picture for me is the one of Joachim with Nellie Melba, a fellow Australian whose alma mater I also attended. Apparently they were great friends with an equally adventurous sense of fun that often perplexed those around them. I like to think you can see a touch of this camaraderie in their portrait.

Working with archives is, for me, always exciting. You never quite know what you’re going to come across or discover and so often the material hasn’t been examined in a long time. The Joachim archive was so full of delights and surprises and it exceeded all my expectations. This internship has been a wonderful experience and one I would highly recommend. It would not have been possible without the generosity of the Joachim family and the support of the Special Collections Team and I’d like to thank them both for the opportunity. I’ve learnt so much about the practical side to archive management and processing, but also had an awful lot of fun learning about a hero in the process. I can’t wait for the next one!

Signed image mounted on card of Joseph Joachim and Nellie Melba, taken by Guigoni & Bossi, Milan, late 19th/early 20th c. (Coll-1711/5/7)

Devon Barnett: 

I wanted to be an Archive Intern so that I could learn first-hand the processes behind turning a collection of items into an organised and usable resource. As a Music graduate, it was an added benefit that the archive I would be working on centred around an important figure in classical music – Joseph Joachim. While working on the Joseph Joachim collection I have learned how to box list items, how to identify anything that may need to be sent to conservation, how to think about what items may be useful and beneficial to be digitised, and how to best categorise, arrange, and reference the items as well as a collection of books.

Image of Joseph Joachim playing cards outside a coffee shop, 1890-1907 (Coll-1711/5/12/5)

I have also learned a lot about Joseph Joachim, both his musical output and his personal life. Shockingly, I had never heard his name even once in my entire four years of studying a music degree and I did not know that he is owed at least in part for helping Johannes Brahms to find success and for helping Clara Schumann to care for Robert Schumann in his final years of critical mental illness. My favourite item of the collection by far was a letter written in 1907 by Donald Francis Tovey. It was written to an unspecified ‘Mrs Joachim’ and concerned the recent passing of Joseph Joachim. The letter is beautifully and poetically written, and really shows the loss felt by the music world. The letter is also important for its personal connection to Edinburgh. Tovey was a composer, musician, musicologist, and close friend of Joseph Joachim. Tovey became the Reid Professor of Music at the University of Edinburgh’s Reid School of Music (from which I have just graduated), and at which there now exists the position of Tovey Professor and the award of the Sir Tovey Memorial Prize for outstanding promise shown in composition or performance. As the university is home to not only the Joseph Joachim collection but also a collection of Tovey’s large collection of books and music scores, this letter is significant and relevant to both, tying them nicely together to both each other and the university.

Letter to ‘Mrs Joachim’ from Donald Francis Tovey on the subject of Joseph Joachim’s death, 1907, p.1 (Coll-1711/1/2/5) (click here for a higher resolution image)

Letter to ‘Mrs Joachim’ from Donald Francis Tovey on the subject of Joseph Joachim’s death, 1907, p.2 (Coll-1711/1/2/5) (click here for a higher resolution image)

Their fantastic work has enabled us to create a great resource on our online discovery platform, ArchivesSpace. Click here to see the catalogue.

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Riddle’s Court, a Discovery

With our this project currently in progress, our eyes and ears are particularly attuned to Patrick Geddes material elsewhere in our collections.  It was a delight recently to stumble across a volume entitled Records relating to the Mechanics’ Library and University Hall, Riddle’s Court.  We have been working very closely with the Education Officer at the Patrick Geddes Centre, Riddle’s Court, so this is an extra special find at this time.

In the late 1880s, Patrick Geddes acquired Riddle’s Court for the purpose of creating University Hall.  Prior to this, it had been in the possession of the Mechanics Library, who had been based there since the mid 1850s.

A volume in our collection contains extracts of records relating to the building’s time as the Mechanics Subscription Library, including the earlier history of the buildings, as well as records of its time as University Hall.  As well as text, the volume is peppered liberally with illustrations.

The first residents moved in for the Winter Session of 1889-90.  There were only three of them – William Speirs Bruce, Riccardo Stephens and William Grant Burn-Murdoch.  All three had a strong connection to Geddes.

Illustration by Louis G Irvine

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Kryoflux-athon – the scores are in!

Box of floppy disks from the Moray House. School of Education collection

Well, its been a very…dexterous day…fingers and hands flipping between 2 sets of screens, two mice and piles of discs but at the end of it we managed to image 65 discs (averaging 13 per hour). This time included labelling each disc with a unique number and logging that disc as having been imaged, with its unique number on a master spreadsheet of items previously audited by our volunteer this year, Julia Konig (Julia previously posted a guest blog here about her time with us).

A great day, if a little noisy at times! Now we just need to get these preserved!

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International Digital Preservation Day – Kryoflux-athon 2017!

Back in July I posted the great news that we’d purchased a Kryoflux, along with 5.25″ drives, to enable us to read the growing number of disks we’re finding in our collections. Following that acquisition we, on Halloween, hosted our own first ‘Bring out your dead’ day, where staff popped into our Digital Triage Unit to seek resuscitation of their precious data. It was such a successful event we’re now empowered to push the boundaries of our capabilities and for one day only…we’re going to run a Kryoflux-athondun, dun, dah!

Just as the ‘Flux Capacitor’ in Back to the Future enabled Marty to travel back in time, we are going to use our ‘Kryoflux’ to travel back in time and harvest as much data off as many disks as we can possibly image, in one day. I’ll be tweeting and Facebooking about our endeavours as the day progresses and I’ll treat you all with a little video of our Kryoflux in action on our Quarantine PC.

Come join me as we head back to 1985…or thereabouts!

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E-Resource Trials ending soon

Last chance to try out the following e-resources and send in your feedback – these trials all end on the 30th November.

AcademicFocus

AcademicFocus is a one-stop access platform for China English journals, including:

1. Academic journals originally published in English in mainland China
2. English translations of top China academic journals (which we have access to via the China Academic Journals database platform)
3. Proceedings of international conferences held in China.

As of October 2017, there are 267 journals and 2447 conference proceedings and the numbers will grow. Subjects cover all areas in science, technology, medicine, social sciences, arts and humanities.

 

Arab World Research Source:™ Al-Masdar

Arab World Research Source is a dedicated resource of scholarly journals, quality magazines, trade publications, industry profiles, country reports, market research reports and conference papers related to the Arab World. This resource reaches across all major subject disciplines, including business, economics, science, technology, humanities and sociology. The database contains more than 140 scholarly full text titles, with the majority of the journals featuring Arabic full text.

 

Bloomsbury Design Library

The Bloomsbury Design Library is a comprehensive online resource offering coverage of design and crafts worldwide, from 1500 BCE to the present day. It combines carefully curated text and image content of the highest quality with an intuitive taxonomy for research and discovery. It can be used to enhance teaching, learning and research in the field of Visual Arts and Design.

 

EBSCO eBooks™ Arabic Collection: Al-Kotob

Serving the countries and territories of the Arabic League and beyond, this Middle Eastern collection of 4,600 Arabic e-books covers a broad range of academic subjects, including art, biography, business, child development, education, medicine, social sciences, humanities, Islamic studies, history, law, music, religion, political science, technology, engineering and more. The collection includes content from noteworthy publishers as well as award-winning authors including Abbas Mahmoud El Akkad, Fatima Naaot, Mohamed Awad Aidi, and Ibrahim Abdel Qader Mezni.

 

MedOne Neurosurgery

MedOne Neurosurgery is a unique online resource providing the global neurosurgical community with unprecedented access to Thieme’s entire neurosurgery collection (E-Books, Journals, Procedures, Cases, Media and Training Center).

 

One Belt, One Road Reference Source

One Belt One Road Reference Source is a collection of full-text journals and publications to support the understanding and study of the One Belt One Road mega-region including parts of Asia, the Middle East, and Central and Eastern Europe. It is the only comprehensive source of full text journals and publications published in, and about the 65 countries which make-up the One Belt One Road initiative.

 

Further info.

Access these and other trials from our Trials Webpage.

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There’s still time to send us your Semester 2 Resource Lists!

The Library Learning Services team has a bit more time to work on lists before the end of the year (Leganto has really helped us speed through our work!)… So, if you missed the deadline, but would like a resource list for Semester 2, please get in touch by Friday 1st December.

If you would like the Library to build your Semester 2 Resource List, please send your annotated list with a completed coversheet to library.learning@ed.ac.uk. We’ll start working on it and try to get books purchased and chapters scanned before the start of term.

You can download the coversheet here: http://www.docs.is.ed.ac.uk/docs/library/ResourceLists/Resource_List_Coversheet_2017.docx

Alternatively, you can create your list yourself and use ‘Send to library’ to request a review.

Remember to prioritise items on your list using the ‘Essential’, ‘Recommended’ and ‘Further reading’ tags, and to request e-reserve scans, use the ‘Digitisation’ tag and ‘Library discussion’ to provide page numbers or chapter details of pages you’d like scanned.

More information

Library creates Resource List

Academic creates Resource List

Louise Dutnell
Course Collections Assistant, Library Learning Services

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Resource Lists: New (and fixed) in November

ExLibris have been busy building new features – and fixing some issues – in Leganto. Here are the edited highlights from the November release:

1. New! Students can add their own tags to citations – these tags are visible only to the student. Students can filter lists using their own tags or the tags added by instructors.

This is a student’s view of a citation with two extra tags added:

C:UsersldutnellAppDataLocalTempSNAGHTML2510d2.PNG

2. Fixed! When you access a list via Learn, you’ll be prompted to open Resource Lists in a  new tab if your browser blocks pop ups. No more error messages!

3. New! Students and course organisers can see recent changes from within a resource list. Now you can select ‘Display recent list changes’ from the reading list options menu:

https://knowledge.exlibrisgroup.com/@api/deki/files/57942/display_recent_list_changes.png?revision=1

Then you’ll see a list of changes specific to that list:

https://knowledge.exlibrisgroup.com/@api/deki/files/57956/recent_list_changes.png?revision=1

4. New! Course dates will display both start and end dates.

  • For a course running in single year, the year appears as before. For example: 2017
  • For a course that spans one year to the next (i.e. one academic year), the years appear as: 2017/18
  • For a course that spans over more than two years, the years appear as: 2017-19

5. Fixed! Cite it! has been fixed to work with ScienceDirect. So, when you use Cite it! to add articles from Science Direct, the information will show up correctly on your list.

If you have any questions about the new features or resource lists in general, please get in touch at library.learning@ed.ac.uk

P.S. Although the semester 2 deadline has officially passed, please do still send your lists in by Friday 1st December and we’ll do our best to build them (and get books ordered and chapters scanned) before the start of term.

Louise Dutnell
Course Collections Assistant, Library Learning Services

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Explore Your Archive 2017

The Explore Your Archive Campaign is run in conjunction with the Archives and Records Association, the professional body for archivists in the UK and Ireland. The University of Edinburgh is joining in this campaign, running from 18 to 25 November, led by colleagues in the Centre for Research Collections. Throughout social media you will see archivists promoting their archives, whether they are interesting, intriguing, puzzling or pleasing, using the hashtag #exploreyourarchive.

Here at New College Library we have made a significant step to help you explore your archive. For the first time, the catalogues which have previously only been available in the Library itself are now available online. There are over 530 catalogue entries for New College archives now freely searchable on archives.collections.ed.ac.uk . You can browse the whole collection, or search by person, organisation, place (in some instances), and limit searches by date.

The process of creating the online catalogue has revealed the strengths of the collection and the breadth of topics covered. Far from being simply a treasure trove of Scottish church history material, the collections include:

In addition, digital images of some of the archives and special collections, including our copies of the National Covenants can be found on https://images.is.ed.ac.uk – click on the New College icon.

Should you wish to consult any material you find through the online catalogue you are welcome to visit New College Library or contact new.college.library@ed.ac.uk. All archives and manuscripts are consulted in the Funk Reading Room at New College Library.

The first of the daily hashtags for Explore Your Archive week is #archivecatwalk. The annual class and graduation photographs taken in New College, the earliest of which is from 1857 (ref. AA1.8.2), provide a fascinating timeline of fashions. The students below would look quite at home in today’s hipster cafes, especially those with the extra cachet of having a cane.

Class Photograph, 1860 (ref. AA1.8.2)

Staff and students at New College, Edinburgh, 1860 (ref. AA1.8.2)

Keep an eye on our tweets and those of our colleagues @EdUniLibraries, @CRC_EdUni, @EU_SSSA, and www.facebook.com/crc.edinburgh/ for further archives exploration.

Kirsty M Stewart, New College Collections Curator

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Collections

Default utility Image An insight into Joseph Joachim’s life and work – Sarah and Devon’s experiences as CRC interns Earlier this year, our two interns Sarah and Devon spent a few months re-housing and...
Default utility Image Riddle’s Court, a Discovery With our this project currently in progress, our eyes and ears are particularly attuned to...

Projects

Default utility Image An insight into Joseph Joachim’s life and work – Sarah and Devon’s experiences as CRC interns Earlier this year, our two interns Sarah and Devon spent a few months re-housing and...
Default utility Image Conservation Volunteers in the Collections Rationalisation Project This week our Project Conservator, Helen, talks about the great work volunteers have done as...

Archives

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