It’s Resource Lists Week 2019!

The Library Learning Services team have been allowed out of the office and we’re on tour all next week. Here’s the schedule:

Monday 11am – 1pm: Main Library

Tuesday 11am – 1pm: Murray Library

Wednesday 11am – 1pm: Chrystal Macmillan Building

Thursday 11am – 1pm: 50 George Square (TBC)

Friday 11am – 1pm: Main Library

We’ll be available to answer any of your questions about resource lists. We’ll also have our laptops, so we’ll do our best to sort out any issues and give you some tips on using your lists.

There will also be sweets, our beautiful crocheted bunting, and some brand new freebies. And… 10 x £10 book vouchers to give away! Very exciting. Come and say hello.

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E-Resources on trial for LGBT+ History Month

Alongside our print book display in the main library, we are also trialling the following E-Resources for LGBT+ History Month:

LGBT Magazine Archive

LGBT Magazine Archive is a searchable archive of major periodicals devoted to LGBT+ interests, dating from the 1950s through to recent years. 26 leading but previously hard-to-find magazines are included in LGBT Magazine Archive, including many of the longest-running, most influential publications of this type. Of particular note, The Advocate is made available digitally for the first time. The Advocate is the oldest surviving continuously published US title of its type (having launched in 1967). LGBT Magazine Archive also includes the principal UK titles, notably Gay News and its successor publication Gay Times.  More info about this e-resource can be found on the SPS Librarian Blog.

Trial ends 28th Feb. – for off campus access please use the University VPN

 

Archives of Gender & Sexuality

Archives of Sexuality & Gender provides a robust and significant collection of primary sources for the historical study of sex, sexuality, and gender. With material dating back to the sixteenth century, you can examine how sexual norms have changed over time, health and hygiene, the development of sex education, the rise of sexology, changing gender roles, social movements and activism, erotica, and many other interesting topical areas. This growing digital archive offers rich research opportunities across a wide span of human history. The database currently includes 3 collections: LGBTQ History and Culture since 1940, Part I and Part II and Sex and Sexuality, Sixteenth to Twentieth Century.  More info about this e-resource can be found on the HCA Librarian blog.

Trial ends 18th March.

Further info

Visit our e-resources trials webpage for more details about currently running trials and to complete feedback forms on trialled e-resources as your comments influence purchase decisions.

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Cataloguing the correspondence of Thomas Nelson & Sons

Cataloguing the correspondence of Thomas Nelson & Sons

Last January, our intern Isabella started a 10-week placement at the CRC, as part of her MSc in Book History and Material Culture. Using our online system ArchivesSpace, she is cataloguing part of the records of Thomas Nelsons & Sons Ltd., a British publishing firm founded in Edinburgh in 1798. So far, she has been dealing with correspondence, advertising material, and printed material relating to publishing, all dating from the end of the 19th century. Here are some of her most interesting finds:

1. W. H. Allen & Co. Copy

1. W. H. Allen & Co.: Pictured above is a beautiful embossing from the stationary of W. H. Allen & Co. Ltd., a London based bookseller and publisher. The company were ‘publishers to the India office’ as can be noted on the seal. The coordination of a lion and a unicorn most likely represents the company’s work across Scotland and England.

2. There are three letters from one Mrs. Allan enquiring about the potential for her 15 year old son to take up an apprenticeship with Nelson & Sons. She describes her son as being a naturally gifted illustrator and when the company takes a bit long to reply she sends further letters describing how she and her son are ‘wearing of waiting’ for a response. Though the company eventually accepted samples of the young Mr. Allan’s work, he was not offered an apprentice position.

3. Lady Aberdeen Insignia

3. Lady Aberdeen Insignia: Pictured above is the signet of Lady Ishbel Aberdeen who wrote to the offices of Nelson & Sons on September 14th 1896, sending several copies of Canadian literary reports and magazines as well as personal letters inquiring as to whether the company would wish to send any penny or bargain literature they may have the copyrights for to Canada as she believes the country is in desperate need of ‘good, cheap literature.’ She speaks about her children’s magazine “Wee Willie Winkie” named after the Scottish fairy tale as well as the National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC). Lady Aberdeen was the founder of the NCWC, an advocate for the creation of the Victorian Order of Nurses as well as a well-known supporter of the Canadian suffrage movement. The signet is a blue embossed crown containing her initials wrapped together with a vine-esque tie (information on Lady Aberdeen acquired via the Canadian Encyclopaedia).

4. Frank Mahony (1)

4. Frank Mahony (2)

4. Frank Mahony (3)

4. Frank Mahony (4)

4. Frank Mahony (5)

4. Frank Mahony (6)

4. Frank Mahony: Pictured above are six printed illustrations from illustrator Frank P. Mahony. Mahony was an artist from Melbourne Australia whose work was used in the construction of the ‘New South Wales Reader’ a larger and heavily documented project undertaken by Nelson & Sons transcontinentally in congress with several agencies in Australia including leather workers, booksellers, and authors. As can be seen, the copies of the illustrations have been warped from years of being curled into a scroll-esque form at the centre of a group of letters and cost projections for the ‘New South Wales Reader.’ In order to examine each paper with minimal damage, two glass weights are placed at the edges of the copy pictures to examine them as a whole without compromising the form the paper has taken over years of storage.

5. Oxford University Press

5. Oxford University Press: This letter addressed to Nelson & Sons is a copy of a letter from the University Press of Oxford requesting manuscript materials for the Presbyterian Hymnal with Tunes, a project which was spearheaded by Reverend James Anderson of Toronto. The initial correspondence regarding the publication of the Presbyterian Hymnal between Reverend Anderson and George Brown of Nelson & Sons deals mostly in obtaining or paying license for the use of tunes from other previously published hymnals. The various letters sent between the two men gives a glimpse into the nature of musical copyright laws and penalties in 1896 both in Canada, where the Reverend Anderson was based and in Scotland where Nelson & Sons offices were. The publication of the hymnal went on to be so successful that the University Press of Oxford requested to take up the publication of the piece as well.

6. Schwebius signature

6. Schwebius letter: Much of the cataloguing done for this archive requires some previous exposure to palaeography, or the study of dated handwriting. However, sometimes in deciphering particularly unclear script a second opinion or cross referencing is required to confirm the context of a letter in order to properly interpret the piece. For this letter, the name Schwebius, though written twice, was not entirely apparent in its spelling. The content of the letter referred to the sale of a foundry and various machines from a leatherworker in New York. The cataloguer referred to a digitized directory from the library of Hoboken, New York which not only lists the recipient of this letter, a George Schwebius, but mentions details of his business which were substantiated by the letter from the Nelson Archive. Corroborating information across archives and databases allowed not only for the correct spelling of the sender’s name to be identified but gave further insight into the transactions between the sender and Nelson & Sons.

7. George Brown’s signature

7. George Brown’s Signature: In 1896 Nelson & Sons decided to invest several substantial sums which were guaranteed by an American investment firm. Their correspondence with the American firm was directed to a Mr. Stewart Tods and concerned the investment of two separate sums of more than 10,000 dollars each. The letter, though entirely concerned with business, reflects the genial nature of professional signatures from the time. Here George Brown, a manager at Nelson & Sons, signs ‘Believe me, Yours Faithfully’. Though the letter concerns references to significant sums of money and is a reflection of a transaction, the signature is incredibly genial and far more affectionate than would be used in the same manner of business today.

8. Nelson & Sons employed a vast number of employees who all were integral to discovering, creating, and marketing literature. From travel writers to leather testers, Nelson & Sons often employed numerous professionals to vet their literature including Jane Macgregor and Jane Borthwick. Though each women worked with the company under other supervisions at various periods, Jane Borthwick was a translator of German hymns as well as a writer of English hymns, a collection of letters in this archive reveals that these two women were also engaged as test readers for the manuscripts sent to the company. Many of the letters sent by Borthwick and Macgregor reference literature they have been sent which contains female protagonists, from which it could be inferred that Nelson & Sons were recruiting female employees for female driven literature.

The Thomas Nelson collection (Coll-25) on our online catalogue: https://archives.collections.ed.ac.uk/repositories/2/resources/85801

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On trial: digital collections relating to the slave trade and slavery in the West Indies

Thanks to a request from staff in HCA the Library currently has access to two digital archive series from British Online Archives relating to the slave trade in the West Indies, Running the West Indies: British records from West Indian countries under colonial rule and The trade in people: The slave trade in Africa and the West Indies.

You can access these digital resources via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 17th March 2019. Read More

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Nature Journals 2019 renewal

With the 2019 renewal of our Nature journals collection, we gain access to 3 new titles.

Nature Machine Intelligence will publish high-quality original research and reviews in a wide range of topics in machine learning, robotics and AI.  The journal will also explore and discuss the significant impact that these fields are beginning to have on other scientific disciplines as well as many aspects of society and industry.

 

Nature Metabolism publishes work from across all fields of metabolism research that significantly advances our understanding of metabolic and homeostatic processes in a cellular or broader physiological context, from fundamental cell biology to basic biomedical and translational research.

 

Nature Reviews Physics is an online-only journal publishing high-quality technical reference, review and commentary articles in all areas of fundamental and applied physics.

Further info

All 3 titles are available via our e-journals AZ list or DiscoverEd.

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On trial: Archives of Sexuality & Gender

Thanks to a request from staff and students in HCA the Library currently has trial access to the Archives of Sexuality & Gender from Gale. This fully searchable digital archive spans the 16th to 21st century and is the largest digital collection of primary source material relating to the history and study of sex, sexuality and gender.

You can access this digital resource via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 18th March 2019.

Archives of Sexuality & Gender include documentation covering social, political, health and legal issues impacting LGBTQ communities around the world, as well as rare and unique books on sex and sexuality from the sciences to the humanities, providing a window into how sexuality and gender roles were viewed and changed over time. The types of documents covered include periodicals, newsletters, manuscripts, government records, organizational papers, correspondence, posters, books and other materials. Read More

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Celebrating 100 years of Social Work at Edinburgh University

Welcome to the blog page of Advisors, Advocates & Activists: A Century and more of Social Work in Edinburgh. Work has now begun on cataloguing the collections of Edinburgh University’s Social Work Department and the papers of associated individuals, including former staff. This blog will keep you updated on the project’s progress and share some it’s highlights.  Alongside posts from the project’s archivist and research assistant it is hoped to have contributions from other individuals who have an interest in the material.

In the meantime you can read more about the project in the About Us section and more about the history of social work education and practice at the university and beyond at www.socialwork.ed.ac.uk/centenary.

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Who You Gonna Call? (Dustbusters!)

This week’s blog comes from Project Collections Assistants, Anna O’Regan and Stephanie Allen, who assisted the Museum Collections Team with a large scale move of artworks by Edinburgh College of Art students to a new collections store at the University Collections Facility (UCF). Supervised by Museum Collections Manager, Anna Hawkins and Preventive Conservator Katharine Richardson, the primary focus of this project was to surface clean the artworks before they were relocated.

When we arrived at the UCF for the beginning of this project, the artworks were stored in a less than ideal location; placed on open shelving, they were exposed to the accumulation of surface dirt. This project facilitated their move into a closed, environmentally controlled storage facility which was built specifically to house the University’s Museum and Art collections.

Roller Racking Storage at UCF

Read More

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Trial access to Wiley Digital Archives

The Library is running a  trial until 5th April for three recently launched Wiley Digital Archives collections:

  • Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland
  • New York Academy of Sciences
  • Royal College of Physicians

They can be searched simultaneously at https://app.wileydigitalarchives.com/wiley or separately via the links below.  Trial feedback forms are available here or later via our E-Resources Trials webpage.  A demo can be viewed at:

 

 

The Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland

Contains original primary source materials that have been discovered and researched for over a century by the members of the RAI.  From archaeology and historical research to geographical and religious studies, the collection contains an extensive body of diverse and interdisciplinary original materials including Administrative Records; Correspondence; Data; Ephemera; Fieldwork; Gray Literature; Illustrations; Manuscripts; Maps; Monographs; Pamphlets; Periodicals; Personal Papers; Photographs; Proceedings and Reports.  More info about this collection in the video below.  Explore the collection at https://app.wileydigitalarchives.com/rai

 

 

 

The New York Academy of Sciences

The New York Academy of Sciences collection contains the vast range of original sources that have shaped two centuries of scientific progress, Spanning a wide range of disciplinary research from medical research and botanical studies to climate science and zoological research, the Wiley Digital Archives: New York Academy of Sciences collection contains an extensive body of diverse and interdisciplinary original materials.  Explore the collection at https://app.wileydigitalarchives.com/nyas

 

 

The Royal College of Physicians

This collection reflects interdisciplinary interests in a broad range of subject areas, that span over 500 years of history, with some material pre-dating the founding of the Royal College of Physicians.  From astronomy and anatomical studies to neurology and botanical research, the collection comprises an extensive body of diverse and interdisciplinary original materials.  Topics include History of Medicine; History of the Royal College of Physicians; Regulation, Law, Policy, and Control;  Medieval and Early Modern Texts; Non-Western Medicine; Anatomical Studies; World Health; Vaccinations; Medieval and Early Modern Diseases and Medical Treatment; Public Health and Common Diseases; Military Medicine; Early Medical Textbooks.  Explore the collection at https://app.wileydigitalarchives.com/rcp.

 

Further info

All Library trials are listed on our e-resources trials webpage.

We are also trialling;

Twentieth Century Religious Thought: Volume IV, Eastern Religions

Age of Exploration (ends today)

Chinese Newspapers of Modern China

LGBT Magazine Archive

Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War

BabelScores

Global Digimap

Visit our e-resources trials webpage for more details about the above trials and to complete feedback forms on trialled e-resources as your comments influence purchase decisions.

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Rare Books – Expect the Unexpected 5

Wet Monday, Henry VIII Falls in the River, and the Ogre of Smeeth, all funded through the Bank of Sweets.

For our fifth visit to the ECA Illustration students’ Notgeld project we enter the world of myth and legend. Many of the German towns used local legends to illustrate their Notgeld, and several of the students went the same way.

Monika Staachowiak:

For my notgeld project I was inspired by Polish traditions and folklore.
The first notgeld with domination 10pln represents – Lajkonik.
The Lajkonik is one of the unofficial symbols of the city of Kraków, Poland. It is represented as a bearded man resembling a Tatar in a characteristic pointed hat, dressed in Mongol attire, with a wooden horse around his waist (hobby horse). It is the subject of the Lajkonik Festival that takes place each year on the first Thursday after the religious holiday of Corpus Christi. Integral part of the celebration is a great street parade. It demonstrates the victory of Krakow’s residents over the Tatars.

The second notgeld with domination 20pln represents Śmigus-dyngus also known as lany poniedzialek, meaning “Wet Monday” in Polish.
It is celebrated on the first Monday after Easter, and the way to celebrate is actually really fun: you need to pour water on other people.
Traditionally, the boys need to pour water over girls, and they also need to spank them with pussy willow branches, and girls do the same to boys. It is believed that the girl that is most wet or the one that received most amounts of water, has more chances to get married.

The third notgeld with domination 50pln is representing – Masqueraders (carolers).

In the Polish tradition, during the Christmas period, carollers dressed up and walked in the villages from house to house with wishes of prosperity in the New Year. The carolling group wore mascarons, which was often accompanied by comic and frightening scenes and performing various kinds of pranks to spectators. The whole spectacle was accompanied by the atmosphere of general cheerfulness.

Polish folklore. Monika Stachowiak

Petra Wonham:

My Notgeld notes are based on tales of King Henry Vlll in Tudor Hitchin, I have used a variety of techniques to print them such as lino, riso and letterpress, and I have kept to a simple colour palette. The denominations are based on money used in Tudor times.
[Henry VIII used to hunt in the countryside around Hitchin. The Notgeld illustrates the local tale that he fell in the river – either because he tried to vault over it and his pole broke, or he fell off his horse during the chase]

King Henry VIII visits Hitchen, Hertfordshire. Petra Wonham.

Tiggy Wilkes:

Designs inspired by folk tales and superstitions from my home county, Norfolk. The Black Shuck, a werewolf who roamed the coast, The Pedlar of Swaffham who dreamt he found treasure in his garden, and The Ogre of Smeeth who occupied a forest for many years until he was slayed. I created them in an old 18th century style, as if they were warnings and tales to inform the locals at the time.
Created using letterpress and lino relief printing.

Norfolk folklore. Tiggy Wilkes

 

Our apologies for including this final entry in this post, where it seems not to belong. We had hoped to pay more attention to examples of Notgeld using interesting units of currency.  In post World-War I Germany some Notgeld was produced in unusual materials, including compressed coal dust, and many of the students thought about  their currencies very carefully.  You may have noticed Zhaoyang Chen’s Bank of Rabiland, in a previous post, counted in ‘Caro[t]s’, Naiomi Sun’s Utopian money is issued in units of time, and Rosie Cockrell’s Sheffield runs on units of forks. We thought that Zoe Zhou’s Bank of Sweets took the biscuit!

Zoe Zhou

For me this project is characteristic of time which reminds me of my childhood. In the set every note is quite different because I tried to show different side of that period. One of them is about the lovely children having sweets, rather than money, I believe sweets are valued by them. The other two are about my hometown and my favourite place to go with my parents, the aquarium.

Bank of Sweets. Zoe Zhou

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