Trial – Macmillan Cabinet Papers 1957-1963

AM logoWe have trial access to the Macmillan Cabinet Papers 1957-1963 until the 19th February.

Macmillan Cabinet Papers, 1957-1963 provides complete coverage of the Cabinet conclusions (minutes) (CAB 128) and memoranda (CAB 129) of Harold Macmillan’s government, plus selected minutes and memoranda of policy committees (CAB 134).  Further information about the content can be found here.

Feedback and further info

We are interested to know what you think of this e-resource as your comments influence purchase decisions so please do fill out our feedback form.

A list of all trials currently available to University of Edinburgh staff and students can be found on our trials webpage.

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Trial – Cambridge Archive Editions Online

CAE-bannerWe have trial access to Cambridge Archive Editions Online until the 20th February.

Cambridge Archive Editions Online is an extensive collection of historical archive materials on the modern political development of the Arabian Peninsula and the Persian Gulf, Russia and the Balkans, the Caucasus, Southeast Asia, and China and the Far East. The collection consists of over 1000 digitised books published by Cambridge University Press which can be accessed in full page images with searchable metadata. This resource is particularly rich for the study of boundary formation, claims and disputes.

Feedback and further info

We are interested to know what you think of this e-resource as your comments influence purchase decisions so please do fill out our feedback form.

A list of all trials currently available to University of Edinburgh staff and students can be found on our trials webpage.

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China Local Gazetteers and China Economic Statistics – New E-Resources

wanfang data logoFollowing a successful trial on the Wanfangdata platform, we now subscribe to China Local Gazetteers and China Economic Statistics.

China Local Gazetteers is a collection of Chinese local gazetteers published after 1949, covering all regions of China. There are over 26,400 volumes of e-books included in this database which contain a range of information covering various aspects of local economic, social and political life.

China Economic Statistics offers time-series records on macro-economic data, industry and sector data, regional data with over 10,000 economic indicators.

Both e-resources have been added to our Databases A-Z list as well as the Economics and East Asian Studies A-Z subject lists.  They will be listed on our catalogue and Searcher next week.

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New books at New College Library – January

The invention of GodFood, sex and strangersAn anthropological theme to our featured new books this month. The invention of God in indigenous societies / by James L. Cox. is now available in the Reserve section BL380 Cox. at New College Library.  Food, sex and strangers : understanding religion as everyday life  by Graham Harvey is also available at BL48 Har.

These titles were purchased for Religious Studies at the School of Divinity, Edinburgh University.

New College Library has a regular display of new books at the far end of the Library Hall, close to the door to the stacks.You can see an regularly updated list of new books for New College Library on the Library Catalogue – choose the New Books Search and limit your search to New College Library. Here’s a quick link to new books arriving in the last few weeks. A word of caution – some of the books listed here may still be in transit between the Main Library (where they are catalogued) and New College Library, so not on the shelf just yet.

Christine Love-Rodgers, Academic Support Librarian – Divinity

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Katie Paterson – Future Library

Neil Lebeter, Art Curator, writes about how a forest in Norway and a new library collection in 2114 are linked

Future Library Tree

Future Library Tree.

We are very, very excited to announce that the University has acquired, or should I say will be acquiring, Future Library by Scottish artist Katie Paterson.

Future Library is an incredibly ambitious art work that currently takes the form of a single print and also a forest in Norway. Let me explain.

Katie, who graduated from Edinburgh College of Art in 2004, was gifted an area of forest in Norway, where trees have been planted. These will supply paper for a collection of books that will be printed in 100 years time. Between now and then, one writer every year will commissioned to write a text – Margaret Atwood was announced as the first author last year. The manuscripts will be held in trust, unpublished, until 2114.

The texts will be held in a specially designed room in the New Public Deichmanske Library, Oslo and a Trust has been set up to care for the project and the forest itself.

Until 2114 rolls round, we will have a very lovely print that Katie has just completed, pictured above. Having heard Katie speak about this work first hand, the aspect of this that has really stuck in my mind is the notion of time. For us, 100 years is tantalisingly just out of reach – it is unlikely that the majority of us will be alive when these books are published. 100 years, therefore, may as well be a 1,000 or 100,000 in terms of our perception. However, in the life of the forest, 100 years is nothing. A blink of an eye.

So, in 2114 – 100 specially commissioned, beautifully printed books will arrive at the University of Edinburgh. For a Curator – this is one of the most unusual things I have ever considered.

I’d best leave a note to warn people.

http://www.katiepaterson.org/futurelibrary/

Neil Lebeter, Art Curator.

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3 Additions to the LUNA Book Reader Collection

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We kick off 2015 with the addition of 3 new Book Readers added to LUNA. The first two are both music manuscripts that came down to the DIU as part of the Readers Orders trolley. It is not often that we receive volumes to be digitised in their entirety this way, so it seemed a good opportunity. As a result we spared a bit of time to do the additional work to prepare them for the book reader software after the High Resolution images had been delivered to the customers. Read More

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ARAS: The Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism – New E-Resource

logoFollowing a successful trial, we now subscribe to ARAS: The Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism.

The ARAS archive contains about 17,000 photographic images, each cross-indexed, and accompanied by scholarly commentary. The commentary includes a description of the image with a cultural history that serves to place it in its unique historical and geographical setting. Often it also includes an archetypal commentary that brings the image into focus for its modern psychological and symbolic meaning, as well as a bibliography for related reading and a glossary of technical terms.

This online resource will be of particular interest to students and staff of Edinburgh College of Art, and the Schools of History, Classics and Archaeology, and Literature, Languages and Culture.  It has been added to our database A-Z list, several subject A-Z lists, our catalogue and Searcher.  Further information about our databases can be found at http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/information-services/library-museum-gallery/finding-resources/library-databases.

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Action required: Update your bookmark tool

Univeristy of Ediburgh Logo

Talis Aspire have launched an updated bookmark tool that will work with both HTTP and HTTPS websites.

Background

In reaction to a number of security issues that occurred last year, many websites have slowly been changing from a HTTP address to a HTTPS address. Moving websites to a HTTPS address increases security by adding a ‘secure certificate’ to the site.

However, the addition of this secure certificate has been clashing with the Talis Aspire bookmark tool and may have been preventing it from working on some of the sites that you regularly use. (The bookmark tool is the button that appears on your browser bookmarks bar which is used for adding resources to lists).

What do I have to do?

When Talis Aspire detects that it is being used on a HTTPS website a pop-up window will let you know that a newer version of the bookmarklet is available and provide instructions on how to install it. Please install the newer version of the bookmark tool when prompted.

The current bookmarklet will still work on HTTP websites; however, we would recommend you update the bookmarklet tool. Talis Aspire have made it even easier to do this.

Adding or updating the bookmarklet tool is a quick process. Go to http://resourcelists.ed.ac.uk/ and then to the ‘My bookmarks’ tab. On the right of the page is an ‘install bookmark button’, click on this and Talis Aspire will detect which browser you’re using and walk you through adding the bookmark tool.

More information on how to make the most of Resource Lists can be found on the Resource Lists using Talis Aspire webpage and the ResourceLists@Edinburgh Blog.

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Stephanie Farley

Library Learning Services Assistant

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Dawsonera – unable to download e-books

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One of our major e-book providers – Dawsonera is suffering from technical issues relating to downloading e-books for off-line use.  E-books can still be read online.

They will post to https://twitter.com/dawsonera when they have updates – they have not been able to provide a time-scale for resolution.

Update – this is now resolved

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What makes a good Resource List?

Univeristy of Ediburgh Logo

The content is important, but what about the style and structure? What about length? Can a list be too long? Or too short? In what ways can a resource list interact and engage with students?

A great feature of Resource Lists @ Edinburgh is the flexibility. We have lists created by academics across the University across a wide variety of schools and subjects, each using resource lists in their own specific way.

CertAVP Equine Dentistry by Sharon Boyd at the Royal Dick Veterinary School

Sharon’s list contains just seven items and provides clear instructions on reading expectations for the class. It also advises where to go find additional abstracts and sources. The Vet Schools’ ‘Instructions for using this Reading List’ is extremely useful and has been adapted by Library Learning Services and is used on many of the lists we create for course organisers.

The sources of knowledge: Understanding and analysing research literature by Dr Peter Allison at the School of Education

Featured as one of our ‘Great Lists’ last year, this continues to be an excellent list. What initially caught our attention was Peter’s note at the top of the list encouraging students to contact the course organiser with any materials that may be particularly useful in particular web pages or YouTube clips. These have been collected towards the bottom of the list in the section ‘Useful Websites’ and, by the number of resources in this section, it looks to have been quite successful in promoting self-study and engagement with students.

Peter also uses the list to encourage skill learning. In ‘Session One’  a resource link is provided to the University Library Catalogue and then in the notes students are directed to search for and locate a specific article. Details are also provided on where to find additional guidance via the information skills module in Learn.  

Social History 2.2 The Making of the Modern Body – History, Classics, and Archaeology

History reading lists tend to be quite large as the format of their lists are to provide a wide range of options from which students are encouraged to self select and prioritise.

To help make this large volume of reading options easier to navigate, Social History 2.2 has been split into three separate lists. One for Lecture and Tutorial readings (226 items), one for the Essay Title readings (141), and one for the Group Project readings (62 items).

 

If you would like to create a resource list but are unsure how to best format a list for your course please get in touch, we’re more than happy to sit down with you and come up with a solution together.

More information on how to make the most of Resource Lists can be found on the Resource Lists using Talis Aspire webpage and the ResourceLists@Edinburgh Blog.

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Stephanie Farley

Library Learning Services Assistant

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Collections

kp_futurelibrary_tree_rings_small Katie Paterson – Future Library Neil Lebeter, Art Curator, writes about how a forest in Norway and a new library...
A.S. a native of Habach and a member of a minor reformed order of Fransiscans 3 Additions to the LUNA Book Reader Collection We kick off 2015 with the addition of 3 new Book Readers added to LUNA....

Projects

Frostie-calf-CROP-259x300 Frozen: The story of Frostie the calf Ian Wilmut is best known for his involvement with the team which cloned Dolly the sheep...
Ms39BookReader01 The Most Beautiful Book in Scotland and the Oldest Scottish Manuscript? We are delighted to announce that 2 manuscripts have been added to our growing collection...

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