The resource lists system is changing, but the service is staying the same

The new resource lists system will be launching in June, but our service won’t be changing. Course Organisers will still be able to create their own resource lists or, alternatively, send the details over to the Library and we’ll set up the resource list in Leganto. We’ll announce deadlines in due course – keep an eye on the blog for details.

As well as creating and reviewing resource lists, the Library will continue to order new or additional copies of books (or ebooks), process scans and move books to the HUB or Reserve.

How the Library orders books for courses

It’s important to continue to prioritise the items on your resource lists as ‘Essential’, ‘Recommended’ or ‘Further Reading’. As well as complying with the University’s Accessible and Inclusive Learning Policy, it helps students manage their workload, and helps the Library make sure there are enough books on the shelves (or ebooks online). When the Library decides how many books to purchase, we look at the student numbers for the course and the priority assigned to each of the resources. If there aren’t enough books available, we make purchases based on the following ratios:

Priority Purchased Location
Essential 1 copy per 20 students Distributed across HUB Reserve, Short and Standard Loan
Recommended 1 copy per 40 students Short Loan
Further reading Direct request required from Course Organiser – 1 copy purchased Standard Loan

If you have any questions, please contact us at library.learning@ed.ac.uk.

 

Louise Dutnell, Course Collections Assistant

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Do we have access to the British Newspaper Archive?

A question I get asked quite a lot is if we have access at the Library to the British Newspaper Archive. And it is the sort of question that I would usually be able to give a yes or no answer to but in the case of the British Newspaper Archive it isn’t quite as simple.

In fact the answer I would normally give is either “Yes, BUT…” or “No, BUT…”and I’ll try to explain why.

“Drawers” (https://flic.kr/p/gaUXpW) by Luke McKernan (https://flic.kr/ps/vNbEP) is licensed under CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/).

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Introducing My Collection in Leganto

What is My Collection?

Course Organisers and students will have a My Collection area in the new resource list system, Leganto. My Collection lets you collect and store relevant items; these can be any type of resource, physical or digital. My Collection items can be annotated, sorted and filtered, and exported to create a bibliography (you can select your preferred citation style too). Course Organisers can also use My Collection to gather together resources ready to drag and drop into resource lists.
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Leganto – What’s in a Name?

As we prepare to officially launch Leganto – our new Resource Lists system – in the next few weeks, we thought we would let you know a bit about the meaning of the term LeganEsperanto tilesto itself.

The word will probably sound familiar to those with a background in Latin, but in fact Leganto
comes from the verb legi (meaning to read), in the constructed language of Esperanto.

Esperanto dates all the way back to 1887 and was first promoted by L. L. Zamenhof. It is nowadays spoken by up to two million people (source: esperanto.net), with roughly 2,000 native speakers, making it the most widely spoken constructed language (or conlang) in the world.

Other famous conlangs in popular culture include Klingon and J.R.R. Tolkien’s elvish languages of Quenya and Sindarin.

Zamenhof published the first book in his constructed language under the pseudonym Doktoro Esperanto (which translates as “one who hopes”).

So, exactly along the same lines, the meaning of Leganto is “one who reads”, a Reader.

Now that you know the origin of its name, over the next few weeks there will be a chance to read all about Leganto and its range of features in our regular blog posts.

In the meantime, if you would like to find out more about invented languages there is a variety of sources on DiscoverEd.

 

Iraklis Pantopoulos

Course Collections Assistant

Library Learning Services

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Managing your bookmarks in preparation for the move to Leganto

As part of the move from Talis Aspire, the Library will copy all published resource lists from 2016/17 to the new reading list system, Leganto. We’ll also copy archived lists, lists with no time period (Vet school) and any lists you’ve let us know you’d like transferred.

Resource lists will be copied bookmarks won’t

The complete published resource lists WILL be copied, but the individual bookmarks that course organisers have saved will NOT be copied automatically to the new system. Bookmarks are the resources you save to add to a list. You see these on the right of the screen when you’re creating a list.

Most of your bookmarks will already be in use on a resource list. You only have to follow the guidance below IF you have bookmarks that you have kept to add to a resource list at a later date and want to copy these to the new reading list system.

Copy your bookmarks

If you have bookmarks that you would like to move to Leganto, please follow the guidance below to take a copy of the bookmarks before Monday 10th July.  There will be no access to Talis Aspire after this date.

Here’s how:
1. Log in to your existing the Resource Lists @ Edinburgh account at: http://resourcelists.ed.ac.uk/ using your EASE login.

2. Select “My Bookmarks” from the options at the top

3. Tick the top checkbox on the left-hand side to select all your bookmarks.

  • Alternatively you might want to only export selected bookmarks by clicking only the checkboxes of those items you want to export.

4 A) Click on the Action blue button on the top right.

4 B) From the drop-down menu that appears select Export Citations.

You now have a .ris file containing all your selected bookmarks. Keep this file.

Once you have access to your reading lists in Leganto, you can use the .ris file to import your current bookmarks into ‘My Collection’ in Leganto.

There’s short video (1.47) demonstrating how you would import your .ris file to a resource list:

https://knowledge.exlibrisgroup.com/Leganto/Training/Leganto_for_Instructors/06_Add_Citations_via_RIS_File_Import

Using Leganto, Course organisers and students have the option to add resources (citations) to ‘My Collection’ where they can add tags and make notes.

Please contact Library.Learning@ed.ac.uk if you have any questions.

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NEW! Rhizomata: a journal for ancient philosophy & science

We now have full access from volume 1 to this De Gruyter title, first published in 2013. Read More

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Several Theses in One Binding

In this week’s blog post, Projects Conservator Nicole, gives us an update on the work she is carrying out for the Thesis Digitisation Project…

I am currently working on a collection of theses ranging in date from 1838 – 1850. They consist of theses of all different sizes that have been bound in large book cloth bindings. Some bindings contain up to 9 individual theses, which has made the spine more than 10cm in width. With such large bindings and different sized pages, surface dirt has accumulated in between the individual theses, and the bottom of the spines have become distorted and narrowed.

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Theses before conservation treatment

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‘BLAST’ – a journal that will ‘try and brave the waves of blood, for the serious mission it has on the other side of World-War’

‘…THIS PUCE-COLOURED COCKLESHELL […] HAS TO SPRING UP AGAIN WITH NEW QUESTIONS AND BEAUTIES WHEN EUROPE HAS DISPOSED OF ITS DIFFICULTIES…’

Detail from the 'puce-coloured' front cover of 'Blast', issue 2, July 1915, in the A.H. Campbell Collection.

Detail from the ‘puce-coloured’ front cover of ‘Blast’, issue 2, July 1915, in the A.H. Campbell Collection.

These were the words of Wyndham Lewis (1882-1957), editor of Blast, in his editorial piece published in the July 1915 issue (only the second issue) of the journal. About that issue, he said that it ‘finds itself surrounded by a multitude of other Blasts of all sizes and descriptions’.

Detail from the front cover of 'Blast', showing month of publication of issue 2... being July 1915... in the A.H. Campbell Collection.

Detail from the front cover of ‘Blast’, showing month of publication of issue 2… being July 1915… in the A.H. Campbell Collection.

Blast was the literary magazine of the Vorticist movement in Britain and it only survived two issues. The first issue came out only weeks before the beginning of the War, and the second came out a year later in 1915. It featured a woodcut by Lewis on the cover.

Detail from the front cover of 'Blast', issue 2, a woodcut by Wyndham Lewis, in the A.H. Campbell Collection.

Detail from the front cover of ‘Blast’, issue 2, a woodcut by Wyndham Lewis, in the A.H. Campbell Collection.

 

The vorticists were an avant-garde group formed in London in 1914 – with Wyndham Lewis as its founder – aiming towards an art that expressed the dynamism of the modern world. Vorticism was launched with the journal Blast which, within its content included manifestos ‘blasting’ the effeteness of British art and culture and proclaiming the vorticist aesthetic.

Detail from the title page of 'Blast' issue 2, July 1915, in the A.H.Campbell Collection.

Detail from the title page of ‘Blast’ issue 2, July 1915, in the A.H.Campbell Collection.

Vorticist painting combined Cubist fragmentation of reality with an imagery derived from the machine and the urban environment. In its embrace of dynamism, the machine age and all things modern, it is more closely related to Futurism.

One of the signatories to the Vorticist manifesto was Jessica Dismorr (1885-1939). Her illustrations show a sharing of the involvement with the dynamism of the machine-age city. In 'Blast', issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

‘The Engine’ by one of the signatories to the Vorticist manifesto Jessica Dismorr (1885-1939). Her illustrations show a sharing of the involvement with the dynamism of the machine-age city. In ‘Blast’, issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

Blast, issue 2, included designs by painter and illustrator Jessica Dismorr (1885-1939), artist and architect Frederick Etchells (1886-1973), artist and sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (1891-1915), painter Jacob Kramer (1892-1962), and by figure and landscape painter, etcher and lithographer, Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946).

'On the way to the trenches' by Nevinson, in 'Blast' issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

‘On the way to the trenches’ by Nevinson, in ‘Blast’ issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

It also contained graphic contributions from the figure and portrait painter William Roberts (1895-1980), Helen Saunders [or Sanders] (1885-1963), Dorothy Shakespear (1886-1973) artist and wife of Ezra Pound, artist Edward Alexander Wadsworth (1889-1949), and also Wyndham Lewis.

'The Design' by Jessica Dismorr (1885-1939), in 'Blast', issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

‘The Design’ by Jessica Dismorr (1885-1939), in ‘Blast’, issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

Other contributions were made by Ezra Pound (1885-1972), Ford Madox Hueffer [Ford Madox Ford] (1873-1939), and T. S. Eliot (1888-1965).

The poem, 'The old houses of Flanders' by Ford Madox Hueffer (Ford Madox Ford) in 'Blast', issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

The poem, ‘The old houses of Flanders’ by Ford Madox Hueffer (Ford Madox Ford) in ‘Blast’, issue 2, July 1915, p.37, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

It had been the unfolding human drama, the unimagined industrial scale of death borne out of the machine-age, and the absolute disaster of the War – known to that generation as the Great War – that came to drain the Vorticists of their creative zeal. The real war experience of Ford Madox Ford influenced his poem ‘The old houses of Flanders’.

The poem, 'A vision of mud' by Helen Saunders in 'Blast', issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

The poem, ‘A vision of mud’ by Helen Saunders in ‘Blast’, issue 2, July 1915, pp.73-74, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

Ford writes of the mournful eyes of the houses watching the ways of men, and of the rain and night settled down on Flanders; how the eyes look at great, sudden red lights and the golden rods of the illuminated rain; how the old eyes that have watched the ways of men for generations close for ever, and how the gables slant drunkenly over.

'Vortex Gaudier-Brzeska (Written from the trenches', in 'Blast, issue 2, July 1915, pp.33-34, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

‘Vortex Gaudier-Brzeska (Written from the trenches’, in ‘Blast, issue 2, July 1915, pp.33-34, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

Unlike Ford, Helen Saunders had no first-hand knowledge of the trenches and the shell blasted Flanders but in her poem ‘A vision of mud’ she took the image of the mud of the trenches to describe a wider sense of foreboding and anxiety. She imagined what would happen to a body underground and about what it would feel like to drown in mud with eyes, nose, mouth and ears filled with it. She imagined the distortion of awareness, and how the body would swell and grow as it filled with mud. She described a muddy soup of bodies.

‘…There is mud all round […]

They fill my mouth with it. I am sick. They shovel it back again.

My eyes are full of it […]

It is pouring into me so that my body swells and grows heavier every minute […]

I have just discovered with what I think is disgust, that there are hundreds of other bodies bobbing about against me.

They also tap me underneath…’

 

Artwork in 'Blast', issue 2, July 1915, p.49, in A. H. Campbell Collection.

Artwork in ‘Blast’, issue 2, July 1915, p.49, in A. H. Campbell Collection.

The trenches were also described by Frenchman Henri Gaudier-Brzeska. He wrote:

Human masses teem and move, are destroyed and crop up again.

Horses are worn out in three weeks, die by the roadside.

Dogs wander, are destroyed, and others come along.

Gaudier_Brzeska_killed

It had been Lewis’s hope that with the end of the War – when Europe had ‘disposed of its difficulties’ – Blast and the Vorticist movement would ‘spring up again with new questions’ in order to tackle the ‘serious mission’ that it would have ‘on the other side of World-War’.

'Design for programme cover - Kermesse', by Wyndham Lewis, in 'Blast' issue 2, July 1915, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

‘Design for programme cover – Kermesse’, by Wyndham Lewis, in ‘Blast’ issue 2, July 1915, p.75, in the A. H. Campbell Collection.

The War brought Vorticism to an end for the reasons already described in paragraphs above, but in 1920 Lewis did make a brief attempt to revive it with ‘Group X’,  a short lived group of British artists formed to provide a continuing focus for avant-garde art in Britain.

'Snow-scene' by Dorothy Shakespear, in 'Blast' issue 2, July 1915, p.35, in A. H. Campbell Collection.

‘Snow-scene’ by Dorothy Shakespear, in ‘Blast’ issue 2, July 1915, p.35, in A. H. Campbell Collection.

The real stories, real imagery, and real maimed victims of War – the horrors of War – had brought about a rejection of the avant-garde in favour of traditional art, and there was a ‘return to order’ and the more traditional approaches to art creation.

'War-engine' by Wadsworth, in 'Blast', issue 2, July 1915, in A. H. Campbell Collection.

‘War-engine’ by Wadsworth, in ‘Blast’, issue 2, July 1915, in A. H. Campbell Collection.

Nevertheless, the typography of the Vorticists possibly places them as important forerunners of the revolution in graphic design that occurred in the 1920s and 1930s.

A copy of Blast, Issue 2, July 1915, was re-discovered in the Papers of Archibald H. Campbell, a collection which had been undergoing preliminary listing.

Dr. Graeme D. Eddie, Assistant Librarian Archives & Manuscripts, Centre for Research Collections, Edinburgh University Library

Used in the construction of this blog-post, in addition to the issue of Blast (2) 1915, were:  (1) ‘ Beyond the trenches’, Dr. Kate McLoughlin, in Research & teaching, Review 2013, pp.30-31, from Birkbeck web-pages [accessed 27 July 2016]; and, (2) ‘Vorticism’ and other pages on the website of the tate.org.uk [accessed 27 July 2016].

 

 

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Students: Save your Resource List reading intentions and notes

We’re currently working on migrating existing resource lists from Talis Aspire over to Leganto. However, reading intentions and notes cannot be moved across to the new system.

Reading intentions are resources that you’ve marked as ‘won’t read’, ‘have read’, ‘will read’, or ‘reading now’ and notes are private notes that you’ve added to any resource on a list. Both of these can be accessed from your Resource Lists @ Edinburgh profile.

What you need to do

If you have used these features to organise your course reading, and you would like to keep hold of this information, you should make sure to save a copy before Monday 10th July.

Save a copy of your notes

First, go to the Resource Lists @ Edinburgh homepage (http://resourcelists.ed.ac.uk) and log in using your EASE login.

To access your profile, click on your name and select ‘View Profile’.

Now click on the ‘My reading intentions’ and ‘My notes’ tabs. All of the books, articles and other resources you have marked with your reading intentions, and your notes, can be viewed here.

Select your citation style, copy and paste to save

Use the drop down menu to select your preferred citation style. Next, to save your notes and reading intentions, highlight all of the items in the list, and copy and paste the text into a Word document. Right click and paste as text, you will see the full citation details along with your reading intentions and notes and any web address.

Please make sure you have saved your copies before 10th July. After this date, reading intentions and notes will no longer be available.

Leganto also has features to add reading intentions, manage your course reading and add tags to items. Keep an eye on the blog for further details!

If you have any questions, please contact Library.Learning@ed.ac.uk

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Conservation and Preservation at St Cecilia’s Hall

by

Emily Hick, Katharine Richardson, Jonathan Santa Maria Bouquet, Nicole Devereux and Helen Baguley

This has been a busy month for the musical instruments collection, as more than 400 objects are being installed in the new display cases at St Cecilia’s Hall. Jonathan has been working with Sarah Deters and the Plowden & Smith team to make the museum look fantastic. We are looking forward to next month when it will be the turn of the keyboard instruments to get unwrapped, adjusted, and rearranged.

Helen has been assisting Jonathan at St. Cecilia’s this month in creating a Marvelseal™ package to treat a piano which has an infestation of webbing clothes moth. She has also completed conservation work of the Hortus Sempervirens collection, which has been surfaced cleaned and housed in custom made boxes. Her attention has now turned to the map and atlas collection within the rare books collection.

Nicole has continued working on the Latin theses with broken sewing and split spines. She has also been working on theses that have been digitised prior to conservation. Conservation work on these volumes include rehousing and consolidation. Before Nicole took up the post as Projects Conservator, biological samples had been found within the collection, including broken microscope slides and cross sections of lungs which had been laminated and bound into a volume. Nicole researched the risks of handling and storing them. Professor Colin Smith from the Pathology Department kindly came to assess both of the volumes. He came to the conclusion that the lung specimens posed no risk to health, and could be kept. However, he advised that the slides should be disposed of as they do not have any medical value, and pose a hazard to health.

Cross section of lung, laminated and bound into a volume

This month, Katharine recruited an Edinburgh University student through the Employ.ed scheme for a 10-week summer internship funded by the innovation fund. The intern will focus on developing an e-learning resource on integrated pest management (IPM) and collections care. This will be created using the data collected from the IPM inspections over the last year, and research on the subject that Katharine has undertaken. We hope to hold a launch event to conclude the placement, for staff to have the opportunity to trial the e-learning resource.

At the end of March, we welcomed a new intern to the Conservation team. Claudia Callau Buxaderas is the third in a series of interns who will be working on the Thomson-Walker collection of medical prints. The internship will last eight weeks, and will mainly involve removing old adhesives and secondary supports from the prints and rehousing them in acid-free folders and boxes.

New Thomson-Walker Intern, Claudia

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