DiscoverEd is live!

You can now access DiscoverEd at http://discovered.ed.ac.uk

DiscoverEdLogoBoWWebYou can also search and access DiscoverEd directly from the search box on the Library homepage (www.ed.ac.uk/is/library). And you can access it via the Library tab on MyEd.

DiscoverEd can be searched via the DiscoverEd search points pcs (formerly Library Catalogue machines) in all Library sites. Please note if using DiscoverEd on these machines you cannot sign in and the search is limited to our local collections i.e. books, journal titles, DVDs, etc. See Using DiscoverEd Search Points.

Want help using DiscoverEd? Try our FAQs.

Or contact the Helpline (IS.Helpline@ed.ac.uk).

 

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Finding and access e-journals in DiscoverEd

You can search for journal titles or browse the “ejournals A-Z” to find and access e-journals in DiscoverEd.

–> Search DiscoverEd

Previously our e-journals A-Z list was separate to the Library Catalogue and Searcher. Now this is fully integrated into DiscoverEd, so you have two ways of finding e-journals in DiscoverEd.

If searching for a specific journal (either e-journal or print journal) then just type the journal title into the search box on DiscoverEd or the DiscoverEd search box on the Library website.

IF

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DiscoverEd goes live: update on Resource Lists @Edinburgh

The Library launched its new discovery service, DiscoverEd on Tuesday 30th June. DiscoverEd replaced both the Library Catalogue and Searcher, as well as the ejournal portal.

Resource Lists updated
Items on your resource lists have been updated and should now link to item records in DiscoverEd.

We have completed a series of initial checks and are happy that most of the items linking to library holdings have updated successfully.

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The blessing of discovery

One of our colleagues recently rediscovered this fantastic invitation card for the launch of the Library’s first online library catalogue. It dates back to 1985.

The invitation card for the launch of EULOGIA, 1985

The invitation card for the launch of EULOGIA, 1985

The system was named ‘EULOGIA’ (‘Edinburgh University On-line for General Information Access’).

‘Eulogia’ comes from the Greek for ‘blessing’ – and it most certainly was for both users and staff, as a beginning for the move away from card catalogues. Many of our colleagues, who were here at the time, recall this as a revolutionary moment and had great fondness for the system.

Of course, we are feeling blessed again 30 years on at the launch of our new system, ‘DiscoverEd’, which is available now.

Laura Shanahan
Head of Collections Development and Access

With thanks to Richard Battersby, Head of Library Academic Support, for sharing this little piece of history.

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MIMEd abroad! Two members of the MIMEd staff travel to Boston to spread the news about the SCH redevelopment.

 

In June, Jonathan Santa Maria Bouquet and Sarah Deters travelled to Boston to attend the 44th Annual Meeting of the American Musical Instrument Society (AMIS) Conference, hosted by the musical instrument department of the Museum of Fine Arts. AMIS is one of the most important conferences in the field of organology and the annual conference brings together researchers, museum professionals, and collectors from across the world to gather and discuss the latest advancements and discoveries in organology.

Professor Donaldson throws a party when he is appointed the Chair of Music.

Professor Donaldson throws a party when he is appointed the Chair of Music.


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Last day

Today is my final day working with the William Ronald Dodds Fairbairn Archive, as my six-month, Wellcome Trust funded post comes to an end.

The main aim of my post was to reorganise and then catalogue the archive, in advance of associated conservation work, so that the records can be made available via a new website, created and hosted by the University of Edinburgh, our Fairbairn Project partners. I am delighted to be able to say this work is now almost complete and the records will be available to researchers when the website goes live later this year.

Since I am not a researcher, and this is not a scholarly article, I thought I might share some of my non-scientific interpretations of Fairbairn, as gleaned through his extant papers.

The vast majority of the papers in Fairbairn’s archive relate to his profession. This includes manuscripts and offprints for over 70 articles and lectures written by Fairbairn, some of which appear never to have been published. There are about as many reviews, written by Fairbairn, of the works of other authors, and a collection of offprints Fairbairn kept of the articles of others, which complement his library, held at Edinburgh University Library. As well as this, there are copious notes, in which Fairbairn seemingly poured forth his ceaseless thoughts, theories and re-conceptualisations (which seemed to come almost faster than he could write them down) of what psychoanalysis could be. And of course, there are the papers that relate to his private practice and his own self-analysis, including his dream drawings. All of this builds a picture, often remarked upon by those that knew him, of an extremely hard-working, focused and determined man who was almost entirely absorbed by his chosen field.

Indeed, for a time in the 1920s, Fairbairn appears to have become interested in graphology, and a friend, unidentified at this point, records what a practitioner made of a sample of Fairbairn’s own writing.

104187335.1

However, by comparison, the relatively small amount of more personal material in the archive offers glimpses into another aspect of Fairbairn’s personality. Here we see a more vulnerable and highly self-aware side to his personality, typically surrounded by his family in the photographs we have, but aware of the limitations of his own upbringing.

family

Here also is a man who records in his personal diaries his experience of the First World War – including his participation in the Battle of Jerusalem – partly captured in the crumpled, manuscript remains of a play Fairbairn had started to write based on his experiences of the Middle-Eastern front.

103831197.1

These same diaries reveal Fairbairn to us as a schoolboy, seemingly more interested in sport, particularly cricket, than in academia.

Fairbairn comes across as a meticulous, hard-working, kindly person, and as with all the people I have come to know through their papers, I only wish I had known him.

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School’s in for Summer!

At the beginning of June I began working with the Moray House Archive at the CRC. It’s been a fantastic collection to work with, as every box I have opened has contained something new and presented different conservation problems.

A box from the Moray House Archive, before and after conservation

A box from the Moray House Archive, before and after conservation

My favourite so far has been a box containing craft work donations. It held five needlework samples, a cotton dress and an embroidery piece. The needlework samples were mounted on a piece of faux leather, which had been rolled tight and stiffened over time, so that it was difficult to view. Since these items were relatively small, I decided it would be best to store them flat so reduce excessive handling of the samples which could lead to further damage.

Box of craft work donations

Box of craft work donations

First the samples needed to be flattened as they had a tendency to curl at the edges. To do this, I carefully held the corners down with glass weights and left them overnight, after which they remained flat by themselves.

Needlework sample, rolled before conservation

Needlework sample, rolled before conservation

Needlework sample held down with glass weights to flatten

Needlework sample held down with glass weights to flatten

I then made a bespoke folder for each item. The folders were made from unbuffered mount board, with a domette and calico cotton layer to provide cushioned support for the samples. The edges were built up using strips of mount board and sealed with linen tape. The cushioned support can be made for the upper and lower side of the folder so that the items can be closed, flipped over, and then opened up again to view the back, without touching the item at all.

Needlework sample in bespoke folder, after conservation

Needlework sample in bespoke folder, after conservation

This new housing will prolong the life of these textiles and provide an easy way for them to be displayed in the future.

As a part of my time working with the archives collections, I have also hosted two conservation workshops for CRC staff. In the first workshop, I described basic conservation techniques that archivists could use at their desk to improve the condition of the collection. During the session staff had a go at surface cleaning, removing metal fasteners (staples and paper clips) and rehousing techniques such as making a book shoe. The second session focused on the using archival material in outreach workshops. I described ways of protecting objects when using them with groups of people and also how to present them in ways to avoid excessive handling.

'Conservation for Archivists' workshop

‘Conservation for Archivists’ workshop

'Use and Display of Archival Materials' workshop

‘Use and Display of Archival Materials’ workshop

I have really enjoyed working with this collection. The diversity of objects and the range of activities involved have been very interesting. Throughout the collection there are humorous and curious items that have always made me smile when working through the shelves. I’ll leave you with a couple of my favourite to enjoy!

Sick note from the Moray House Archive

Sick note from the Moray House Archive

Exam paper from the Moray House Archive

Exam paper from the Moray House Archive

Emily Hick

Project Conservator

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Do it like they do on the DiscoverEd channel

DiscoverEd is the Library's discovery service and principal search tool

DiscoverED, the University of Edinburgh’s new one step information, discovery and delivery service, is now on-line and fully operational. You can request Library Annexe items using the new service; all you have to do is sign in and find the items using the search bar. As well as books, DiscoverEd will search ebooks, ejournal articles and more.

The first request for a Library Annexe item was placed by non-other than our staff member Dominic Tate. Congrats Dominic, we know how important this is to you. [You will receive your diploma in the mail shortly.]

You can read all about DiscoverED at the links below.

About DiscoverEd

Search for Library Annexe items and more

Marko Mlakar, Library Annexe Assistant

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How to find a book in DiscoverEd

If searching for a known item e.g. book, journal article, etc., use a combination of title and author keywords.

–> Search DiscoverEd

For example, if you were looking for this book:

Carter, S., Kelly, F. and Brailsford, I. (2012) Structuring your research thesis. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan.

You could do a search using the keywords “carter”, “structuring” and “research”. DiscoverEd will look for items that include all the keywords in the item record.

[SCM]actwin,0,0,0,0;DiscoverEd - Google Chromechrome25/06/2015 , 15:19:22

You could add more keywords into the search, such as the other author names or the word “thesis” from the title. Or you could use the Advanced Search option to perform your search. Read More

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Collections

Sarah-Donaldson-300x225 MIMEd abroad! Two members of the MIMEd staff travel to Boston to spread the news about the SCH redevelopment.   In June, Jonathan Santa Maria Bouquet and Sarah Deters travelled to Boston to attend...
P1000632-300x225 School’s in for Summer! At the beginning of June I began working with the Moray House Archive at the...

Projects

103831197.1 Last day Today is my final day working with the William Ronald Dodds Fairbairn Archive, as my...
0031996d Instrumental Challenges Last week saw the start of a new project- photographing many of the University’s Musical...

Archives

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