New! Tanzania and Malawi in records from colonial missionaries, 1857-1965

I’m pleased to let you know that the Library now has access to Tanzania and Malawi in records from colonial missionaries, 1857-1965 from British Online Archives. This database gives you access to 54,550 digital pages from the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa (UMCA) archives including correspondence, journals, magazines, books, reports, etc.

You can access Tanzania and Malawi in records from colonial missionaries, 1857-1965 via the Databases A-Z list, the Digital primary source and archive collections guide or the African Studies databases list. You can also access it via DiscoverEd.

The UMCA was founded in the late 1850s, after the return of Dr David Livingstone from the region in 1857. This high church Anglican society drew its missionaries initially from the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Durham and Dublin. Under its motto “A servant of servants”, from its main centres of Zanzibar and Nyasaland (now Malawi), the UMCA began from an early date opposing the slave trade and promoting the education of the indigenous people and the training and ordination of African priests. Continue reading

New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester two, 2018/19 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

Heart: a history by Sandeep Jauhar (shelfmark: QP111.4 Jau.)

Heineken in Africa: a multinational unleashed by Olivier van Beemen ; translated by Bram Posthumus (HD9397.N44 Bee.)

Tangled diagnoses: prenatal testing, women, and risk by Ilana Löwy (e-book).

Pervasive punishment: making sense of mass supervision by Fergus McNeill (shelfmark: HV7419 Macn. Also available as e-book).

Can we all be feminists?: seventeen writers on intersectionality, identity, and finding the right way forward for feminism edited by June Eric-Udorie (shelfmark: HQ1221 Can.)

Energy and geopolitics by Per Högselius (e-book).

Reclaiming Afrikan: queer perspectives on sexual and gender identities curated by Zethu Matebeni (shelfmark: HQ75.16.A35 Rec.) Continue reading

LGBT Magazine Archive: Trial access

I’m happy to let you know that just in time for LGBT History Month the Library currently has trial access to the LGBT Magazine Archive from ProQuest. This new primary source database is a searchable archive of major periodicals devoted to LGBT+ interests, dating from the 1950s through to recent years.

You can access this digital resource via the E-resources trials page.
Access on-campus is direct, for off-campus access you must use VPN.

Trial access ends 28th February 2019. Continue reading

New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester one, 2018/19 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

The Blood telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, and a forgotten genocide by Gary J. Bass (shelfmark: E855 Bas.)

Where underpants come from: from checkout to cotton field: travels through the new China and into the new global economy by Joe Bennett (shelfmark: HD9736.C62 Ben.)

The European Union’s evolving external engagement: towards new sectoral diplomacies? edited by Chad Damro, Sieglinde Gsteohl and Simon Schunz. (e-book).

Taxing Africa: coercion, reform and development by Mick Moore, Wilson Prichard and Odd-Helge Fjeldstad (shelfmark: HJ3021 Moo. Also available as e-book).

Peace for Lebanon?: from war to reconstruction edited by Deirdre Collings (shelfmark: DS87 Pea.)

Town twinning, transnational connections and trans-local citizenship practices in Europe by Andreas Langenohl (e-book). Continue reading

Fitba’ crazy, fitba’ mad? A football inspired reading list (yet again!)

The 2018 World Cup kicks off today in Russia and to mark this occasion we decided to resurrect and update our football inspired reading list that we originally published just over 2 years ago when Euro 2016 began (and 2 years before that when the 2014 World Cup started – don’t say we don’t have any new ideas!) These are just a small number of the e-books currently available to staff and students of the University in the Library’s collections that look at different aspects of the beautiful (or not so beautiful) game from a social sciences perspective.

Football and supporter activism in Europe: whose game is it? edited by Borja García and Jinming Zheng explores and compares football governance, fandom culture and supporter engagement in Europe. With a specific focus on supporter activism and campaigning, the collection provides a comparative study of several European countries. The authors argue that supporters, despite being the pillar or the ‘lifeblood’ of their club, see their role in football governance marginalised. The volume is unique in that it challenges the widely accepted assumption that membership football clubs encourage the democratic participation of supporters.

Marketing and football: an international perspective edited by Michel Desbordes and Simon Chadwick examines in two parts the study of football marketing in Europe and the development of a marketing dedicated to football, with the question of the European example being used worldwide.

Football hooliganism, fan behaviour and crime: contemporary issues edited by Matthew Hopkins and James Treadwell focuses on a number of contemporary research themes placing them within the context of palpable changes that have occurred within football in recent years. The collection brings together essays about football, crime and fan behaviour from leading experts in the fields of criminology, law, sociology, psychology and cultural studies. Continue reading

New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester two, 2017/18 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

The politics of borders: sovereignty, security, and the citizen after 9/11 by Matthew Longo (shelfmark: JC323 Lon. Also available as e-book.)

Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Paternalism by Jason Hanna Kalle Grill (e-book).

The unending hunger: tracing women and food insecurity across borders by Megan A. Carney (shelfmark: JV6602 Car.)

Big data, little data, no data: scholarship in the networked world by Christine L. Borgman (e-book).

“Return” in post-colonial writing: a cultural labyrinth edited by Vera Mihailovich-Dickman (shelfmark: PR9085 Ret.)

Havens in a storm: the struggle for global tax regulation by J.C. Sharman (shelfmark: K4464.5 Sha.) Continue reading

New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester one, 2017/18 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

Controlling capital: public and private regulation of financial markets edited by Nicholas Dorn (shelfmark: K1066 Con. Also available as e-book).

The rise of the outsiders: how mainstream politics lost its way by Steve Richards (shelfmark: JC423 Ric.)

Energy politics and rural development in Sub-Saharan Africa: the case of Ghana by Naaborle Sackeyfio (e-book).

Decolonizing anthropology: moving further toward an anthropology for liberation edited by Faye V. Harrison (shelfmark: GN345 Dec.)

Transforming patriarchy: Chinese families in the twenty-first century edited by Gonçalo Santos and Stevan Harrell (shelfmark: HQ684 Tra. Also available as e-book).

Residential child and youth care in a developing world. 1, Global perspectives 1 edited by Tuhinul Islam and Leon Fulcher (shelfmark: HV862 Res.) Continue reading

New library subject guides for SPS

We’ve been revamping the library subject guides for School of Social and Political Science. So if you’re just starting at the University or you are a returning student why not take a look?

The subject guides include information about and links to library resources, facilities and services both specifically for your subject area and for general library use.

You can find new subject guides for the following subject areas:

These subject guide pages have been completely overhauled and we hope these will prove useful to you.

Caroline Stirling – Academic Support Librarian for School of Social and Political Science

New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester two, 2016/17 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

The crisis of the European Union: a response by Jürgen Habermas ; translated by Ciaran Cronin (shelfmark: JN40 Hab. Also available as e-book).

Women, work, and politics : the political economy of gender inequality by Torben Iversen and Frances Rosenbluth (shelfmark: HQ1236 Ive.)

The Sage handbook of resistance edited by David Courpasson and Steven Vallas (e-book).

Gandhi in political theory: truth, law and experiment by Anuradha Veeravalli (shelfmark: DS481.G3 Vee. Also available as e-book).

Traces of the future: an archaeology of medical science in Africa edited by Paul Wenzel Geissler, Guillaume Lachenal, John Manton and Noémi Tousignant ; with special contributions by Evgenia Arbugaeva and Mariele Neudecker (shelfmark: R651 Tra.)

Digital labor: the Internet as playground and factory edited by Trebor Scholz (shelfmark: HM851 Dig. Also available as e-book). Continue reading

ProQuest Congressional on trial

The Library currently has trial access to the full range of digital collections for ProQuest Congressional. In addition to our existing Congressional Record access this provides access to the ‘Congressional Research Digital Collection’, or CRDC a collection of research materials – CRS Reports and Committee Prints – created for Congress. It also gives access to the ‘Congressional Hearings Digital Collection’, a collection of published and unpublished hearings held by Congress.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends on 1st April 2017.

Continue reading