5 recommended library resources for Africa Week

Today, 25th October, is the start of Africa Week 2018 at the University. A chance to celebrate the University’s engagement across the African continent. There are a number of events taking place to mark Africa Week but I wanted to highlight just some of the library resources available to staff and students of the University that will allow you to study and research Africa and Africa related subjects further.

1. C.A.S. collection on 4th floor, Main Library

Have you ever been searching DiscoverEd for a book or journal related to Africa and come across shelfmarks starting C.A.S.?

C.A.S. simply stands for the Centre of African Studies and there is a substantial collection of books and journals, separate to the general lending collections on the 2nd and 3rd floor of Main Library, that were purchased on behalf of the Centre over many years. The C.A.S. collection can be found on the 4th floor of the Main Library on the South-East side of the floor. This is a really interesting collection of material, mostly published in the 20th century, and includes material published by commercial and academic publishers, government agencies, Unesco, the Centre of African Studies, etc.

The C.A.S. collection is now a closed collection i.e. no newly purchased books are added to this collection, but it’s not the only place you will find books on Africa or African related subjects in the Main Library. There are a large range of books throughout the general lending collections on 2nd and 3rd floor and the HUB area, you will find books relating to Africa at a number of the site libraries as well and there are a considerable number of e-books, e-journals (and print journals) available relating to Africa. Just search DiscoverEd to discover more.

2. University’s archives – Centre for Research Collections

The University of Edinburgh holds world class collections, including rare books, archives and manuscripts, art, historical musical instruments and museum objects. And it is the Centre for Research Collections (CRC) on the 6th floor of the Main Library that is your gateway into these unique collections. Continue reading

Get referencing right: some useful resources

Working on your assignment and unsure how to do references? Wondering what references, citations, endnotes, footnotes, etc., actually are? Don’t know your Harvard style from your Chicago style? We’ve got a few useful online resources that should help demystify the referencing process.

(Lego Academics, 2014)

What is referencing?

Referencing is the process of acknowledging other people’s work when you have used it in your assignment or research. It allows the reader to locate your source material as quickly and easily as possible so that they can read these sources themselves and verify the validity of your arguments. Referencing provides the link between what you write and the evidence on which it is based.

(Cite Them Right Online, no date)

Continue reading

5 recommended library resources for LGBT+ History Month

February has seen the celebration of LGBT+ History Month in the UK and you may have enjoyed one of the many fantastic events put on by the University’s Staff Pride Network or the University’s Students’ Association. LGBT+ History Month may be near the end but I wanted to highlight just some of the library resources available to staff and students of the University that will allow you to study and research LGBT+ history further.

1. Books, journals, articles, etc.

The Main Library is co-hosting a ‘micro-exhibition’ with student groups Project Myopia and LiberatEd with a pop-up book display on the ground floor this week. A LGBT+ History Month Resource List has also been put together to highlight the wide range of LGBT+ books available at the University Library. This is just a selection of titles available at the Library and you can use DiscoverEd to find more.

You can also use DiscoverEd to search for and find a large range of journal articles and journals on LGBT+ related research. Or you can go further in your research by using some of the bibliographic databases the Library has access to that will allow you to search for journal articles, abstracts, book reviews, book chapters, reports and proceedings, etc.

2. What to watch?

You can use some of the Library’s moving image and video streaming databases to search for and view films, documentaries, news programmes, interviews, plays, TV programmes, etc. Continue reading

New! International encyclopedia of public health

Thanks to a request from staff in the School of Social and Political Science the Library now has online access to all 7 volumes of the International encyclopedia of public health (2nd ed.) The Encyclopedia is an authoritative and comprehensive guide to the major issues, challenges, methods, and approaches of global public health.

You can access the International encyclopedia of public health via DiscoverEd. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Continue reading

Getting referencing right: some useful resources

Working on your, possibly first, assignment and unsure how to do your references? Not know the difference between references and citations, endnotes and footnotes, Harvard or Chicago, etc? We’ve got a few useful online resources that should help demystify the referencing process.

IF

(Lego Academics, 2014)

Good referencing is essential.

Referencing the readings and material you have used for your research is vitally important.  Not only does it demonstrate that you have actually spent time doing the research and using it to form your own opinions or arguments but it also means that you are not trying to make it seem that someone else’s work is your own. Continue reading

Find peace in the Library

Finding peace in the library might mean finding a bit of quiet study space to you. If that’s the case, have a look at our guide to quiet and silent study space.

International Peace Day

However, September 21 is the U.N. International Day of Peace, which seemed like a good day to highlight the resources available in Edinburgh University Library for peace and conflict resolution. Continue reading

New to the Library: Africa-Wide Information

I’m pleased to let you know that after a successful trial earlier this year the Library has now subscribed to Africa-Wide Information from EBSCOhost. Bringing together 50 databases sourced from Africa, Europe and North America, Africa-Wide Information provides comprehensive, multidisciplinary information which documents research and publications by Africans and about Africa.

Africa_wide_information_logo

You can access Africa-Wide Information from the Databases A-Z list. Continue reading

New to the Library: Academic Video Online

The Library has recently purchased access to the large and comprehensive online streaming video resource Academic Video Online from Alexander Street Press. Covering a wide range of subject areas, students and staff can use this resource to find content to meet your learning, teaching, and research interests.

Academic_Video_Online_pic

You can access Academic Video Online from the Databases A-Z list.

Academic Video Online provides us with access to over 50,000 video titles covering subject areas such as Anthropology, History, Criminal Justice, Business, Counselling, Social Sciences, Education, Theatre and Drama, Diversity Studies, Science, etc. There is a wide range of material available including  documentaries, interviews, performances, news programs and newsreels, field recordings, commercials, and raw footage. And you will find thousands of award-winning films, including Academy, Emmy and Peabody winners. Continue reading

New to the Library: British Politics and Society

I’m happy to let you know that following a successful trial and positive feedback the Library has now purchased access to Nineteenth Century Collections Online: British Politics and Society from Gale Cengage.

IF

You can access Nineteenth Century Collections Online: British Politics and Society via the Databases A-Z.

British Politics and Society brings together primary source documentation that enables a greater understanding and analysis of the development of urban centers and of the major restructuring of society that took place during the Industrial Revolution. Continue reading