New! Kenya and Zimbabwe under colonial rule, in Government reports

I’m happy to let you know that the Library now has access to two digital primary source collections covering colonial rule in African countries in the 20th century. The two databases are Kenya under colonial rule, in Government reports, 1907-1964 and Zimbabwe under colonial rule, in Government reports, 1897-1980. Between them they contain 290 documents with over 158,000 pages of original primary source material.

You can access both of these databases via the Digital Primary Source and Archive Collections guide, the Databases A-Z list or the African Studies subject guide. Continue reading

New! British Labour Party and Independent Labour Party Papers

I’m happy to let you know that the Library now has access to 3 British Online Archive digital collections of primary source documents relating to British political history in the 20th century:

  • British Labour Party Papers, 1906-1968
  • British Labour Party Papers, 1968-1994
  • Independent Labour Party Records, 1893-1960.

You can access all 3 databases via the Digital Primary Source and Archive Collections guide, the Databases A-Z list and the Politics and International Relations subject guide. Continue reading

New! Social Work Online

University of Edinburgh Library has recently set up a subscription with ProQuest that gives you access to almost all available ProQuest digital primary source databases until 31st December 2021. See ProQuest Access 350. This is the first in a series of blog posts that will highlight particular databases or collections from ProQuest Access 350 that are relevant to the School of Social and Political Science. 

Social Work Online

Social Work Online is a first-of-its-kind resource that pairs recently published social work textbooks along with compelling documentaries, clinical demonstration videos, and engaging lectures that illustrate the complex and challenging realities social work students will face as practitioners. The content is structured around twelve of the most important topics in the social work curriculum, most of which are applicable worldwide. Continue reading

Oxford Politics Trove – on trial

Thanks to a request from a member of staff from Politics & International Relations, the  Library currently has extended trial access to Oxford Politics Trove, which enables you, for the first time, to search and interrogate the wealth of Oxford’s politics textbook list.

You can access Oxford Politics Trove via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 30th June 2020. Continue reading

Trial access: The Guardian (ProQuest Recent Newspapers)

I’m pleased to let you know that the Library currently has trial access to ProQuest Recent Newspapers: The Guardian, a new resource that gives us full-text and full digitised images of The Guardian newspaper from 2010 – recent (3-month embargo).

You can access ProQuest Recent Newspapers: The Guardian from the E-resources trials page. Access is available on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 1st December 2019. Continue reading

5 recommended Library resources for Africa Week 2019

Yesterday, 24th October, was the start of Africa Week 2019 at the University. A chance to celebrate Edinburgh’s connections to the region. There are a number of events taking place to mark Africa Week but I wanted to highlight just some of the library resources available to staff and students of the University that will allow you to study and research Africa and Africa related subjects further.

1. C.A.S. collection on 4th floor, Main Library

Have you ever been searching DiscoverEd for a book or journal related to Africa and come across shelfmarks starting C.A.S.? Continue reading

New! African Studies – Oxford Bibliographies

I’m pleased to let you know that following a request from staff members in the Centre of African Studies (CAS) the Library now has access to Oxford Bibliographies: African Studies collection.

You can access Oxford Bibliographies: African Studies via DiscoverEd, the African Studies LibGuide or via the entry to Oxford Bibliographies on the Databases A-Z list.

Since the literature on African Studies is diverse, fast moving, controversial, and scattered among unfamiliar sources, Oxford Bibliographies have asked leading scholars to identify the most significant themes and areas of study in their fields, recommend the best sources for exploring them, and discuss these works conceptual and empirical significance to provide a series of guided studies through the diverse approaches to a wide array of complex subjects. Continue reading

LGBT Magazine Archive: Trial access

*The Library now has access to LGBT Magazine Archive until 31st December 2021. See New! LGBT Magazine Archive*

I’m happy to let you know that just in time for LGBT History Month the Library currently has trial access to the LGBT Magazine Archive from ProQuest. This new primary source database is a searchable archive of major periodicals devoted to LGBT+ interests, dating from the 1950s through to recent years.

You can access this digital resource via the E-resources trials page.
Access on-campus is direct, for off-campus access you must use VPN.

Trial access ends 28th February 2019. Continue reading

5 recommended library resources for Africa Week

Today, 25th October, is the start of Africa Week 2018 at the University. A chance to celebrate the University’s engagement across the African continent. There are a number of events taking place to mark Africa Week but I wanted to highlight just some of the library resources available to staff and students of the University that will allow you to study and research Africa and Africa related subjects further.

1. C.A.S. collection on 4th floor, Main Library

Have you ever been searching DiscoverEd for a book or journal related to Africa and come across shelfmarks starting C.A.S.?

C.A.S. simply stands for the Centre of African Studies and there is a substantial collection of books and journals, separate to the general lending collections on the 2nd and 3rd floor of Main Library, that were purchased on behalf of the Centre over many years. The C.A.S. collection can be found on the 4th floor of the Main Library on the South-East side of the floor. This is a really interesting collection of material, mostly published in the 20th century, and includes material published by commercial and academic publishers, government agencies, Unesco, the Centre of African Studies, etc.

The C.A.S. collection is now a closed collection i.e. no newly purchased books are added to this collection, but it’s not the only place you will find books on Africa or African related subjects in the Main Library. There are a large range of books throughout the general lending collections on 2nd and 3rd floor and the HUB area, you will find books relating to Africa at a number of the site libraries as well and there are a considerable number of e-books, e-journals (and print journals) available relating to Africa. Just search DiscoverEd to discover more.

2. University’s archives – Centre for Research Collections

The University of Edinburgh holds world class collections, including rare books, archives and manuscripts, art, historical musical instruments and museum objects. And it is the Centre for Research Collections (CRC) on the 6th floor of the Main Library that is your gateway into these unique collections. Continue reading

Get referencing right: some useful resources

Working on your assignment and unsure how to do references? Wondering what references, citations, endnotes, footnotes, etc., actually are? Don’t know your Harvard style from your Chicago style? We’ve got a few useful online resources that should help demystify the referencing process.

(Lego Academics, 2014)

What is referencing?

Referencing is the process of acknowledging other people’s work when you have used it in your assignment or research. It allows the reader to locate your source material as quickly and easily as possible so that they can read these sources themselves and verify the validity of your arguments. Referencing provides the link between what you write and the evidence on which it is based.

(Cite Them Right Online, no date)

Continue reading