New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester two, 2016/17 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

The crisis of the European Union: a response by Jürgen Habermas ; translated by Ciaran Cronin (shelfmark: JN40 Hab. Also available as e-book).

Women, work, and politics : the political economy of gender inequality by Torben Iversen and Frances Rosenbluth (shelfmark: HQ1236 Ive.)

The Sage handbook of resistance edited by David Courpasson and Steven Vallas (e-book).

Gandhi in political theory: truth, law and experiment by Anuradha Veeravalli (shelfmark: DS481.G3 Vee. Also available as e-book).

Traces of the future: an archaeology of medical science in Africa edited by Paul Wenzel Geissler, Guillaume Lachenal, John Manton and Noémi Tousignant ; with special contributions by Evgenia Arbugaeva and Mariele Neudecker (shelfmark: R651 Tra.)

Digital labor: the Internet as playground and factory edited by Trebor Scholz (shelfmark: HM851 Dig. Also available as e-book). Continue reading

Observing the EU with the EUobserver

The Library has been given trial access to the independent online newspaper EUobserver. Launched in 2000 their aim is to support European democracy by giving people the information they need to hold the European Union (EU) establishment to account.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends on 7th April 2017.

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organisation established in Brussels in 2000. Their team of  journalists file daily news reports from the EU capital and beyond and do in-depth investigations on topics of special interest. EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states. They are not funded by the EU institutions.

The database can be accessed for the duration of the trial period via e-resources trials.
Access is available both on and off-campus.
Trial access ends 7th April 2017.
Feedback welcome.

ProQuest Congressional on trial

The Library currently has trial access to the full range of digital collections for ProQuest Congressional. In addition to our existing Congressional Record access this provides access to the ‘Congressional Research Digital Collection’, or CRDC a collection of research materials – CRS Reports and Committee Prints – created for Congress. It also gives access to the ‘Congressional Hearings Digital Collection’, a collection of published and unpublished hearings held by Congress.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends on 1st April 2017.

Continue reading

Trial access: Women’s Magazine Archive

ProQuest have kindly allowed us to trial for a second time Women’s Magazine Archive I and II  comprising archival runs of leading women’s consumer magazines of the 20th century which up till now have been difficult to locate and navigate.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 15th March 2017.

Continue reading

Trial access: News, Policy and Politics Magazine Archive

Following a request from staff in Politics & International Relations the Library has been able to secure trial access for a second time to News, Policy & Politics Magazine Archive from ProQuest. An archival collection comprising the backfiles of 15 major magazines (including the Newsweek archive), spanning areas including current events, international relations, and public policy.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 15th March 2017.

Continue reading

ProQuest’s ‘Black Newspapers’ on trial

For a limited time only the Library has access to Black Newspapers from ProQuest Historical Newspapers. This fantastic resource contains the archives of 9 individual newspaper titles that provide cultural perspective and insight to the events that shaped the United States in the 20th Century.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 15th March 2017.

Continue reading

New books in the Library for Social and Political Science

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester one, 2016/17 for the School of Social and Political Science and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

digital_sociologies_bookcoverThe new Northern Irish politics? by Jonathan Tonge (shelfmark: DA990.U46 Ton.)

International humanitarian law and the changing technology of war edited by Dan Saxon (shelfmark: KZ6471 Int.)

Routledge international handbook of social work education edited by Imogen Taylor, Marion Bogo, Michelle Lefevre and Barbra Teater (e-book).

Digital sociologies edited by Jessie Daniels, Karen Gregory, Tressie McMillan Cottom (shelfmark: HM851 Dig.) Continue reading

Getting referencing right: some useful resources

Working on your, possibly first, assignment and unsure how to do your references? Not know the difference between references and citations, endnotes and footnotes, Harvard or Chicago, etc? We’ve got a few useful online resources that should help demystify the referencing process.

IF

(Lego Academics, 2014)

Good referencing is essential.

Referencing the readings and material you have used for your research is vitally important.  Not only does it demonstrate that you have actually spent time doing the research and using it to form your own opinions or arguments but it also means that you are not trying to make it seem that someone else’s work is your own. Continue reading

Find peace in the Library

Finding peace in the library might mean finding a bit of quiet study space to you. If that’s the case, have a look at our guide to quiet and silent study space.

International Peace Day

However, September 21 is the U.N. International Day of Peace, which seemed like a good day to highlight the resources available in Edinburgh University Library for peace and conflict resolution. Continue reading