Edinburgh Research Explorer | ER-data: Jan. – June 2019

Edinburgh Research Explorer | ER-data: January 2019 - June 2019
Edinburgh Research Explorer • www.research.ed.ac.uk • ERdata: Jan. – June 2019

The first six-months of 2019, as now seems inevitable, have proved to be the busiest six-months in Edinburgh Research Explorer’s brief history, with 543,152 downloads. This is not only the first time that the half-a-million milestone has been breached within such a short period, but represents a 35% increase on the previous best. As the chart below indicates, this rate of growth is unprecedented following a full 6-months:

Edinburgh Research Explorer: downloads May 2017- June 2019, in six-monthly blocks
Fig i. Edinburgh Research Explorer: downloads May 2017- June 2019, in six-monthly blocks

This report aims to offer an overview of the last six-months of download activity on Edinburgh Research Explorer. The data generated through the IRUS-UK download statistics portal is somewhat limited, it won’t tell us much about the users, in terms of who is downloading what, but it will offer up a few broad clues. This report will investigate those clues under the following headings:

[Also available as a PDF]
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Open Access Scotland Group meeting

Photo by @hblanchett : https://twitter.com/hblanchett/status/1110843583320473600

On 27th March the Scholarly Communications Team at the University of Edinburgh were delighted to host the 6th regular meeting of the Open Access Scotland Group at the impressive Paterson’s Land building (pictured above).

The Group aims to provide a voice for open access in Scotland, allow the sharing of best practice, facilitate opportunities for networking between stakeholders, and lobby on behalf of Scottish organisations. It is an open group and comprises members from Scottish HE institutions and other allied organisations, like academic publishers, software vendors, local and national government agencies and research funders. The group also has honorary members from Iceland and Northern Ireland.

The event on 27th March was attended by 40 people representing over 20 organisations.

Photo by @hblanchett

The first speaker was Pauline Ward who gave a well received talk on Open Science Approaches – including the fantastic Research Data Service at the University of Edinburgh.

During the main session we had a facilitated discussion around issues such as the use of research notebooks, how to do open access for Practise-led Research, and updates on Plan S, UK-SCL and Jisc Support.

The draft notes from the event are available online here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/19OZEX6QajIl-LNgUrGsY-Fdk7LSGUUhvfp0GM2Jubg4

If you are interested in Open Access and are based in Scotland then I would heartily recommend joining up to the Open Access Scotland Group. The next meeting is pencilled in for September and will probably be hosted by the University of the Highlands and Islands in Inverness. Hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

Open Science Conference 2019

This week, I attended the International Open Science Conference in Berlin.  I attended this event last year, and found it so inspiring, I was keen to attend again this year.  Open Science, or Open Research, as we tend to refer to it here in Edinburgh is an important development which will fundamentally change the way researchers and those who support them will work over the coming years.

We are in the process of adopting the LERU Roadmap on Open Science and are working with colleagues across the University with the aim of implementing as many of its 41 recommendations as possible.

The programme was comprehensive and there were far too many good ideas to summarise here, so instead I’d like to focus on a number of key take-home messages I came away with in no particular order:

  1. I need to get to grips with the European Open Science Cloud. It’s such a major intiative and I need to get to grips with what it is, how it works, and how it applies in the Edinburgh context (in an increasingly likely post-Brexit world).
  2. I’m very keen to work more closely with our Research Support Office to see what more we can do to ‘hack’ research proposals before they are submitted to make them more open right from the opurset. Thanks to Ivo Grigorov’s FOSTER Open Science CLINIQUE for the inspiration!
  3. Peter Kraker’s powerful presentation highlighted the risks we leave ourselves open to by allowing commercial monopolies to form within the research lifecycle. I’m increasingly worried that we are sleepwalking from a monopolistic market for library subscriptions to an even more dangerous situation with just one or two for-profit companies owning all the tools that are essential to the research endeavour.   We need to do more to make open infrastructure sustainable.  #dontleaveittogoogle

So, from my reams and reams of notes, those are my three key action points to take forward within the University of Edinburgh.

It was really great to hear Eva Mendez re-stress the importance of seeing the transition to open science as a process of manged, complex, cultural change.  I think that is something I and my colleagues already understand very well, but it’s good to have this re-affirmed!  It was also useful to think about how we need a complete picture of vision, skills, incentives, resources and action plans to avoid confusion, anxiety, resistance, frustration and false starts.

I’d highly recommend this conference and would encourage anyone with an interest in Open Research to attend again next year.  #OSC2019

Dominic Tate

PubMed LinkOut for Pure users

Instructions for Pure users on how to find data to join PubMed LinkOut

PubMed LinkOut is a service where you can send data to NCBI which will allow them to link PubMed records directly to your institutional repository:

PubMed LinkOut

Whilst the benefits for repository owners are obvious – e.g. massively increasing the visibility of your open access content – not many repositories are actually doing this. At the time of writing, in the UK there are only 4 other repositories in the LinkOut programme: University of Strathclyde, Imperial College London, the White Rose consortium & the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Currently there are no other institutions that use Pure so I thought I would investigate and create some instructions.

This blog post will help Pure administrators find URLs to full‐text open access items that have a PMID, but not a PMCID which can be used to send to NCBI.

Step 1: find Pure records that have a PMID, and also have open access full-text.

Note: Pure only holds PMIDs for records that have been imported from PubMed. Unfortunately, PMC IDs are not stored like other identifiers like ISBNs or DOIs. Set up a new report with the following filters:

  • Organisation Unit – include all underlying subunits
  • Source: select value is PubMed
  • Electronic version(s) of this work: Accepted author manuscript/Submitted manuscript

Recommended values for data table:

  • Electronic versions(s) of this work > DOI
  • System info > Source-ID
  • System info > UUID
  • System info > ID
  • Add access version of this item > Open Access embargo date

This report will pull all records from Pure that have been imported from PubMed, and will show the Pure ID/DOI/PMID/UUID and OA embargo date. The UUID will be used to generate a stable URL to the item page in the portal. Export the report as an Excel spreadsheet.

Step 2: Find out which Pure records with PMIDs also have PMCIDs

If a paper has a PMC ID then it will have an open access version in PubMed Central and the LinkOut won’t be interested in including that record. You can use the online PMCID – PMID – Manuscript ID – DOI Converter to find out if the items in the Pure report have PMC IDs:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/pmctopmid/

Cut/paste PMIDs into the box, select CSV result format and convert 100 records at a time. Any more will likely to produce an error.

Ignoring the results with PMCIDs, cut/paste the remaining PMIDs (Identifier not found in PMC) into a new column in the Pure report spreadsheet.

Step 3: Identify the Pure records which can be included in PubMed LinkOut.

So far we have a list of records in Pure that have a PMID (which may or may not have PMCIDs), and a list of PMIDs that have been checked to make sure they don’t have PMC IDs. What we need to do now is merge the data. There are a number of different ways to do this in Excel, but I chose to use the conditional formatting function to highlight duplicate PMIDs in Pure that are on the ‘not in PMC list’ we created. Filtering by colour will then give you a list of records which can be included in the PubMed LinkOut programme. I chose to remove the items which are currently under an embargo which can be identified from the Open Access embargo date, and removed using a filter.

All that is remaining to do is to tidy up the records and add the stable URL. This can be done by taking the UUID-4 value from the Pure report and concatenating with the handle server ID for Pure, for example:

Handle + UUID-4 = URL , e.g:

http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11820/e22c7edc-9533-4ad3-ae44-3f706dd7682c

Now you have a list of URLs of items in Pure that have PMIDs – but crucially not PMCIDs – which you can submit to the LinkOut Programme. You can download a printable PDF version of these instructions here:

Pure PubMed LinkOut instructions