New to the Library: Stuart and Cumberland Papers

I’m really happy to let you know that the Library has recently been able to purchase the extensive Stuart and Cumberland Papers from the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle, digitised for the first time by Gale. This fascinating digital primary source database has been much requested by both students and staff in HCA, as well as ECA and LLC, and I hope it proves to be a useful and well-used resource for teaching, learning and research.

You can access the Stuart and Cumberland Papers via the Databases A-Z list or the Primary Sources database list. Access via DiscoverEd will also soon be possible.

This primary source database contains two remarkable collections, The Stuart Papers and The Cumberland Papers, available online in their entirety. Continue reading

Normandy landings: through our digital primary sources

On this day, 6 June, 75 years ago the Normandy landings took place. This was part of a major combined naval, air and land assault on German-occupied France by Allied forces, codenamed Operation ‘Overlord’. The D-Day landings saw around 150,000 Allied troops land on French soil but it was just the start of a much longer operation to liberate France. In this week’s blog post I have pulled together just a small selection of our digital library resources that will help you explore the Normandy landings, the events leading up to it and the aftermath. And you can use many of these to find out more about the many other events happening around this time that contributed to the end of the Second World War.

D-Day For the Second Front, ‘Illustrated London News’, Saturday 10 June 1944, pp. 644-645. From Illustrated London News Archive.

What did the papers say?

Operation Overlord was top secret, so it wasn’t until the 6th June that news of the invasion began to filter through. Reports of the Normandy landings does appear in some late editions of newspapers from that day but it is mostly covered in issues published the next day, 7th June, or on next subsequent publication date.

Front page of the ‘Daily Express’, Wednesday 7 June 1944. From UK Press Online.

The Library subscribes to a large number of digitised newspaper archives that will allow you to see what events were being reported on at the time and how they were being reported. Read full text articles, compare how different newspapers were covering the same issues and stories and track coverage of Operation Overlord from the Normandy landings onwards. Continue reading

On trial: Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Thanks to a request from staff in HCA the Library currently has trial access to the Adam Matthew Digital research resource Medieval and Early Modern Studies. This offers you access to a huge range of primary sources covering social, cultural, political, scientific and religious perspectives, from the 15th to early 18th centuries.

You can access Medieval and Early Modern Studies from the E-resources trials page.
Access is available on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 17th June 2019.

The breadth of resources provided within this collection is extensive, from sources concerning the Black Death to Restoration of the English monarchy and the Glorious Revolution. Continue reading

On trial: State Papers: Eighteenth Century (Part II)

Thanks to a request from a student in HCA and following a previous trial the Library now has trial access to Part II of State Papers Online: Eighteenth Century, 1714-1782 from Gale. Part II covers State Papers Foreign: Low Countries and Germany.

You can access State Papers: Eighteenth Century (Part II) via the E-resources trials page. Access is direct on-campus but if working off-campus you must use VPN.

Trial access ends 30th May 2019. Continue reading

On trial: Prosecuting the Holocaust: British investigations into Nazi war crimes

I’m happy to let you know that the Library currently has trial access to the brand new digital primary source collection, Prosecuting the Holocaust: British investigations into Nazi war crimes, 1944-1949, from British Online Archives. Drawn from the UK National Archives, this collection contains a wealth of information regarding the British government’s efforts to investigate and prosecute Nazi crimes.

You can access Prosecuting the Holocaust via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 30th April 2019. Continue reading

Spotlight on: FBI Files

This is part of an occasional series highlighting some of the digital resources available at the Library that will be of interest to students and staff in History, Classics and Archaeology.

Federal Bureau of Investigation [Public domain]

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was formed in 1908 by then Attorney General, Charles Bonaparte, under President Theodore Roosevelt. Initially known as the Bureau of Investigation (it added “Federal” in 1935) over the next 110 years the FBI’s remit and influence grew considerably and they are synonymous with American cultural, social and political history in the 20th century and beyond.

The FBI have been involved in a large number of famous, not so famous and infamous cases dealing with organised crime, terrorism, civil rights, white collar crime, espionage, violent crime and more. And did you know that through the Library you have access to a range of digitised files from the FBI?

FBI Files in Archives Unbound

Through the Library’s subscription to Archives Unbound (an enormous digital primary source database) you have access to over 20 collections of digitised material direct from the FBI, covering over 70 years of American history. You’ll spot some famous cases and names within these but possibly also some less known. However, between them they provide a fascinating insight into the political, cultural and social climate of the United States in the 20th century.

FBI File: Julius and Ethel Rosenberg

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were a nondescript couple accused in 1950 by the U.S. government of operating a Soviet spy network and giving the Soviet Union plans for the atomic bomb. The trial of the Rosenbergs, which began in March 6, 1951, became a political event of greater importance than any damage they may have done to the United States. It was one of the most controversial trials of the 20th century. Their guilt and the harshness of their sentences continue to be vigorously debated to this day. Continue reading

On trial: State Papers: Eighteenth Century (Parts I and IV)

Thanks to a request from a HCA student the Library currently has trial access to Parts I and IV of State Papers Online: Eighteenth Century, 1714-1782 from Gale. Part I covers State Papers Domestic, Military and Naval and the Registers of the Privy Council, while Part IV covers State Papers Scandinavia, Eastern Europe and Turkey.

You can access these two collections from here or via the E-resources trials page. Access is available on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 15th April 2019.

Part I: State Papers Domestic, Military and Naval and the Registers of the Privy Council

Screenshot of SP 35/71/1 f.5: Considerations on the nature of oaths, found at Lord North and Grey’s, Sept. 28 1722.

Continue reading

On trial: digital collections relating to the slave trade and slavery in the West Indies

*The Library has now purchased access to the collection ‘Slavery: supporters and abolitionists, 1675-1865 ’. See New to the Library: Slavery: supporters and abolitionists, 1675-1865*

Thanks to a request from staff in HCA the Library currently has access to two digital archive series from British Online Archives relating to the slave trade in the West Indies, Running the West Indies: British records from West Indian countries under colonial rule and The trade in people: The slave trade in Africa and the West Indies.

You can access these digital resources via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 17th March 2019. Continue reading

On trial: Argentina, 1975-1980: The Making of U.S. Human Rights Policy

Thanks to a request from student in HCA the Library currently has trial access to Argentina, 1975-1980: The Making of U.S. Human Rights Policy, just one of the primary source collections from Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) published by ProQuest. This collection chronicles the development of U.S. policy as it attempts to deal with the tragedy experienced in Argentina during the critical, formative period of the late 1970’s.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 19th December 2018.

It was a turbulent and traumatic time in Argentina in the late 1970s, featuring a political collapse verging on civil war; a military coup; and massive illegal detentions, torture and kidnappings. Argentina, 1975-1980 comprises 2,429 documents and these documents show U.S. officials grappling with human rights violations on a scale never heard of in the Western Hemisphere, underscored by the dramatic disappearance of tens of thousands of people at the hands of the security forces. Continue reading

On trial: Colonial State Papers

Further to a request from an academic in HCA I’m pleased to let you know that the Library currently has trial access to Colonial State Papers from ProQuest. From British trade and history, to overseas expansion between the 16th and 18th centuries, Colonial State Papers provide a fascinating insight into the past.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 19th December 2018.

Through collaboration with The National Archives, Colonial State Papers offers you access to over 7,000 hand-written documents and more than 40,000 bibliographic records and is an incredibly useful resource for anyone looking at Colonial History. In addition to Britain’s colonial relations with the Americas and other European rivals for power, the Colonial State Papers also include coverage of the Caribbean and Atlantic world. Continue reading