Explore the Partition of India through our library resources

In August 1947 British India won its independence from the British and split into two new states, India and Pakistan (East Pakistan subsequently became Bangladesh), that would govern themselves. The Partition of India, as it was known, created a huge refugee crisis with millions of displaced people and the level of violence and loss of life prior to and after the Partition has caused reverberations over the years, with hostile relations between India and Pakistan continuing to this day.

With the 70th anniversary of the Partition of India being marked this month I’ve pulled together just a small selection of Library resources that will help you explore the Partition of India further.

What did the papers say?

The Library subscribes to a large number of online newspaper archives that will allow you to see what events were being reported on at the time and how they were being reported. Read full text articles, compare how different newspapers were covering the same issues and stories, track coverage from the start of the Indian independence movement in the 19th century until post-partition.

Screenshot from The Times of India.

The Times of India (1838-2007)
The Library has access to the online archive of The Times of India, which covers the period 1838-2007. The Times of India is the world’s largest circulation English daily newspaper and, as would be expected, is particular valuable for its coverage of key historical events in India, such as the Partition.

But how does this compare with how newspapers in the UK were reporting on it e.g. The Times, The Guardian and The Observer, The Scotsman, etc., or how international newspapers were reporting on events e.g. The New York Times, Washington Post, Japan Times, etc?

Want to look at more recent coverage of the Partition of India? The Library also subscribes to databases, such as Factiva and Nexis UK, that allow you to search and access the full text of a large number of UK and international newspapers from around the 1980s up to date. You can access these, the databases mentioned above and many other newspaper archives and magazine archives from Newspaper Databases. Continue reading

Why football banned women

In this week’s blog I’m using some of the Library’s online resources to find primary source material relating to the popularity of women’s football during and just after the First World War and the decision by the FA to ban it.

The other night on catch-up I watched the Channel 4 documentary When Football Banned Women, programmed to coincide with the Women’s EURO 2017 (which Channel 4 just happens to be showing, it’s like they thought about their programming or something!) This interesting documentary looked at the rise in popularity of women’s football during the First World War and the subsequent decline after the decision by The Football Association (FA) to ban the women’s game in 1921.

If you’ve not seen it you can watch it on Box of Broadcasts (BoB).

Screenshot from ‘When Football Banned Women’ (Channel 4).

As I am always looking for an excuse to use some of the University Library’s fantastic online primary source collections, I decided this was a perfect story to try and find out more about from our online archives.

While I primarily used some of the online newspaper archives the Library has access to for that period, I did do some searching in some other primary source collections that covered the period in question. You can find a list of the specific databases I used at the end of the post.

Women’s football in the First World War

With 1000s of men being called up to fight in the First World War, women were expected to take on roles as never before in the workplace and with this came other opportunities. Women’s football teams began to form, often put together or sponsored by the industries and companies now employing the vast female workforce. These teams began to play matches with the primary aim of raising money for charity and while spectators may have originally attended to help raise money and to watch what they thought of as a novelty, they continued to attend as the matches were good and the teams did have skills. Continue reading

New to the Library: British Library Newspapers, Part V

I’m really pleased to let you know that the Library has purchased access to the final part of Gale Cengage’s British Library Newspapers collection (Part V). This means the Library now has access to the full British Library Newspapers, Parts I-V. 

You can access British Library Newspapers via the Databases A-Z list or Newspapers databases list.

British Library Newspapers, Part V: 1746-1950, has a concentration of titles from the northern part of the United Kingdom with 36 individual titles included. This doubles coverage in Scotland, triples coverage in the Midlands, and adds a significant number of Northern titles to the British Library Newspapers collections. Continue reading

Do we have access to the British Newspaper Archive?

A question I get asked quite a lot is if we have access at the Library to the British Newspaper Archive. And it is the sort of question that I would usually be able to give a yes or no answer to but in the case of the British Newspaper Archive it isn’t quite as simple.

In fact the answer I would normally give is either “Yes, BUT…” or “No, BUT…”and I’ll try to explain why.

“Drawers” (https://flic.kr/p/gaUXpW) by Luke McKernan (https://flic.kr/ps/vNbEP) is licensed under CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/).

Continue reading

The Boston Globe Archive on trial

I’m happy to let you know the Library has trial access to The Boston Globe Historical Archive (1872-1985) from ProQuest. This resource delivers unique coverage of both New England and American history, covering a period of great change in Boston itself and the United States.

You can access this online archive via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 23rd April 2017.

The Great Boston fire of 1872. The infamous 1893 Lizzie Borden axe murder trial. The failed 1919 police strike. Mid-twentieth century decline and renewal. These stories and more, as well as accounts of everyday life in historical New England, can be found in the digitised pages of The Boston Globe (1872-1985). Continue reading

Woman Suffrage Procession: using our newspaper archives for your research

In this week’s blog I’m using some of the Library’s online resources to find primary source material about a specific event, the Woman Suffrage Procession of 1913.

On 3rd March 1913 a woman suffrage procession was held in Washington DC. Not by chance was this date chosen, 3rd March was the day before a new US President, Woodrow Wilson, was inaugurated. It’s estimated that around 5000 women took part in the suffrage pageant organised by the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and the first of its kind in Washington DC.

Adam Cuerden [Public domain or Attribution], via Wikimedia Commons

But what started as a peaceful parade ended with the women being harassed and jeered by onlookers with the police doing little to intervene.

I have to admit I had never heard the story of this parade until I read a short article on it in the March 2017 issue of the BBC History Magazine1. And reading about it, it wasn’t hard to draw parallels with the recent Women’s March that took place in Washington DC and around the world days after the inauguration of a new US President this year.

I wanted to try and find out more about this Suffrage Parade (also referred to as Suffrage Pageant) using some of the resources available at the Library. And I wanted to focus on primary sources about the event, particularly newspaper articles.

So where better to start than by searching and browsing some of the newspaper archives for US titles that we have access to at the Library, specifically the Historical Washington Post (1877-1999), New York Tribune archive (1841-1922) and the Historical New York Times (1851-2012). Continue reading

Trial access: China, America and the Pacific

The Library currently has trial access to the fantastic primary source database China, America and the Pacific: Trade & Cultural Exchange from Adam Matthew Digital. The database allows you to explore the cultural and trading relationships that emerged between America, China and the Pacific region between the 18th and early 20th centuries.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 13th February 2017.

IF Continue reading

Trial access: Second World War primary sources

I’m pleased to let you know that we currently have trial access to two online primary source collections from Archives Unbound that may be of particular interest to those looking at the Second World War and related subjects. The two collections are The Jewish Question: Records from the Berlin Document Centre and Nazism in Poland: The diary of Governor-General Hans Fran.

You can access both of these collections via the E-resources trials page. Access is available on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 15th February 2017.

IF

The Jewish Question: Records from the Berlin Document Centre Continue reading

More e-resources trials available in November

The Library currently has trial access to two databases from Gale Cengage, British Newspapers Part V and Post-War Europe: Refugees, Exile and Resettlement, 1945-1950.

You can access both of these online archives via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Both trials end on 30th November 2016.

Post-War Europe: Refugees, Exile and Resettlement, 1945-1950.

IF Continue reading

Los Angeles Times Archive on trial

For the month of November the Library has trial access to the Los Angeles Times Historical Archive, 1881-1992, from ProQuest.

You can access this online archive via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 30th November 2016.
**Trial has now been extended until 31st December 2016**

512px-los_angeles_times_logo-svg Continue reading