On trial: Prosecuting the Holocaust: British investigations into Nazi war crimes

I’m happy to let you know that the Library currently has trial access to the brand new digital primary source collection, Prosecuting the Holocaust: British investigations into Nazi war crimes, 1944-1949, from British Online Archives. Drawn from the UK National Archives, this collection contains a wealth of information regarding the British government’s efforts to investigate and prosecute Nazi crimes.

You can access Prosecuting the Holocaust via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 30th April 2019. Continue reading

Spotlight on: FBI Files

This is part of an occasional series highlighting some of the digital resources available at the Library that will be of interest to students and staff in History, Classics and Archaeology.

Federal Bureau of Investigation [Public domain]

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was formed in 1908 by then Attorney General, Charles Bonaparte, under President Theodore Roosevelt. Initially known as the Bureau of Investigation (it added “Federal” in 1935) over the next 110 years the FBI’s remit and influence grew considerably and they are synonymous with American cultural, social and political history in the 20th century and beyond.

The FBI have been involved in a large number of famous, not so famous and infamous cases dealing with organised crime, terrorism, civil rights, white collar crime, espionage, violent crime and more. And did you know that through the Library you have access to a range of digitised files from the FBI?

FBI Files in Archives Unbound

Through the Library’s subscription to Archives Unbound (an enormous digital primary source database) you have access to over 20 collections of digitised material direct from the FBI, covering over 70 years of American history. You’ll spot some famous cases and names within these but possibly also some less known. However, between them they provide a fascinating insight into the political, cultural and social climate of the United States in the 20th century.

FBI File: Julius and Ethel Rosenberg

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were a nondescript couple accused in 1950 by the U.S. government of operating a Soviet spy network and giving the Soviet Union plans for the atomic bomb. The trial of the Rosenbergs, which began in March 6, 1951, became a political event of greater importance than any damage they may have done to the United States. It was one of the most controversial trials of the 20th century. Their guilt and the harshness of their sentences continue to be vigorously debated to this day. Continue reading

On trial: State Papers: Eighteenth Century (Parts I and IV)

Thanks to a request from a HCA student the Library currently has trial access to Parts I and IV of State Papers Online: Eighteenth Century, 1714-1782 from Gale. Part I covers State Papers Domestic, Military and Naval and the Registers of the Privy Council, while Part IV covers State Papers Scandinavia, Eastern Europe and Turkey.

You can access these two collections from here or via the E-resources trials page. Access is available on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 15th April 2019.

Part I: State Papers Domestic, Military and Naval and the Registers of the Privy Council

Screenshot of SP 35/71/1 f.5: Considerations on the nature of oaths, found at Lord North and Grey’s, Sept. 28 1722.

Continue reading

On trial: digital collections relating to the slave trade and slavery in the West Indies

Thanks to a request from staff in HCA the Library currently has access to two digital archive series from British Online Archives relating to the slave trade in the West Indies, Running the West Indies: British records from West Indian countries under colonial rule and The trade in people: The slave trade in Africa and the West Indies.

You can access these digital resources via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 17th March 2019. Continue reading

On trial: Archives of Sexuality & Gender

Thanks to a request from staff and students in HCA the Library currently has trial access to the Archives of Sexuality & Gender from Gale. This fully searchable digital archive spans the 16th to 21st century and is the largest digital collection of primary source material relating to the history and study of sex, sexuality and gender.

You can access this digital resource via the E-resources trials page.
Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 18th March 2019.

Archives of Sexuality & Gender include documentation covering social, political, health and legal issues impacting LGBTQ communities around the world, as well as rare and unique books on sex and sexuality from the sciences to the humanities, providing a window into how sexuality and gender roles were viewed and changed over time. The types of documents covered include periodicals, newsletters, manuscripts, government records, organizational papers, correspondence, posters, books and other materials. Continue reading

On trial: Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War

Thanks to a request from a student in HCA the Library currently has trial access to the primary source database Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War from ProQuest. The database is an archival research resource containing a vast collection of rare magazines by and for servicemen and women of all nations during the First World War.

You can access this digital resource via the E-resources trials page.
Access on-campus is direct, for off-campus access you must use VPN.

Trial access ends 28th February 2019.

Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War is a unique source of information on the common serviceman and woman’s experience of the war. These magazines were written by and for every type of unit from every combatant nation. The database gives you the unique opportunity to access unheard voices of hundreds of thousands of men and women writing from every facet of the conflict. Continue reading

New to the Library: The Baltimore Afro-American

I’m happy to let you know that the Library now has access to the digital archive of The Baltimore Afro-American (1893-1988) from ProQuest Historical Newspapers. Founded in 1892 it is the most widely circulated black newspaper on the Atlantic coast and the longest-running family-owned African American newspaper in the United States.

You can access The Baltimore Afro-American (1893-1988) via the Databases A-Z list and Newspapers & Magazines database list. You can also access the title through DiscoverEd* Continue reading

On trial: Tanzania and Malawi in records from colonial missionaries, 1857-1965

Thanks to a request from a student in HCA the Library currently has trial access to the digital primary source collection Tanzania and Malawi in records from colonial missionaries, 1857-1965 from British Online Archives. This gives you access to 54,550 digital pages from the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa (UMCA) archives including correspondence, journals, magazines, books, reports, etc.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page.

Trial access ends 25th December 2018. Continue reading

On trial: Argentina, 1975-1980: The Making of U.S. Human Rights Policy

Thanks to a request from student in HCA the Library currently has trial access to Argentina, 1975-1980: The Making of U.S. Human Rights Policy, just one of the primary source collections from Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) published by ProQuest. This collection chronicles the development of U.S. policy as it attempts to deal with the tragedy experienced in Argentina during the critical, formative period of the late 1970’s.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 19th December 2018.

It was a turbulent and traumatic time in Argentina in the late 1970s, featuring a political collapse verging on civil war; a military coup; and massive illegal detentions, torture and kidnappings. Argentina, 1975-1980 comprises 2,429 documents and these documents show U.S. officials grappling with human rights violations on a scale never heard of in the Western Hemisphere, underscored by the dramatic disappearance of tens of thousands of people at the hands of the security forces. Continue reading

On trial: Colonial State Papers

Further to a request from an academic in HCA I’m pleased to let you know that the Library currently has trial access to Colonial State Papers from ProQuest. From British trade and history, to overseas expansion between the 16th and 18th centuries, Colonial State Papers provide a fascinating insight into the past.

You can access the database via the E-resources trials page. Access is available both on and off-campus.

Trial access ends 19th December 2018.

Through collaboration with The National Archives, Colonial State Papers offers you access to over 7,000 hand-written documents and more than 40,000 bibliographic records and is an incredibly useful resource for anyone looking at Colonial History. In addition to Britain’s colonial relations with the Americas and other European rivals for power, the Colonial State Papers also include coverage of the Caribbean and Atlantic world. Continue reading