New to the Library: The SHAFR Guide Online

Thanks to a request from staff in HCA the Library now has access to The SHAFR Guide Online: An Annotated Bibliography of U.S. Foreign Relations since 1600. This is a near-comprehensive, 2.1 million-word online annotated bibliography of historical work covering the entire span of U.S. foreign relations.

You can access The SHAFR Guide Online via the Databases A-Z list, History database list and other relevant subject database lists. You’ll soon also be able to access it via DiscoverEd.

The SHAFR Guide Online covers all eras in U.S. history from colonial days onwards.

It also includes four new thematic chapters—on economic issues; non-governmental actors; domestic issues, the Congress, and public opinion; and race, gender, and culture.

Created by the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), entries in the guide are drawn from many sources, from collections of government documents to biographies, monographs, book chapters, journal articles, web sites, and more.

Access The SHAFR Guide Online via the Databases A-Z list, History database list and other relevant subject database lists.

Access is only available to current students and staff at the University of Edinburgh.

Caroline Stirling – Academic Support Librarian for History, Classics and Archaeology

New books in the Library for History, Classics and Archaeology

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester two, 2017/18 for the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

Ritual matters: material remains and ancient religion edited by Claudia Moser and Jennifer Knust (shelfmark: Folio BL808 Rit.)

Radiocarbon and the chronologies of ancient Egypt edited by Andrew J. Shortland and C. Bronk Ramsey (e-book).

A companion to the Anglo-Norman world edited by Christopher Harper-Bill and Elisabeth van Houts (shelfmark: DA195 Com. Also available as e-book).

Jefferson: architect of American liberty by John B. Boles (shelfmark: E332 Bol.)

The Pacific war and its political legacies by Denny Roy (shelfmark: D767 Roy.)

Decolonizing the map: cartography from colony to nation edited by James R. Akerman (shelfmark: GA108.7 Dec. Also available as e-book). Continue reading

New books in the Library for History, Classics and Archaeology

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester one, 2017/18 for the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

Early Greek portraiture: monuments and histories by Catherine M. Keesling (shelfmark: NB1296.3 Kee. Also available as e-book).

The crusade in the fifteenth century: converging and competing cultures edited by Norman Housley (e-book).

The long aftermath: cultural legacies of Europe at war, 1936-2016 edited by Manuel Braganca and Peter Tame (shelfmark: D744.7.E8 Lon. Also available as e-book).

Race relations at the margins: slaves and poor whites in the antebellum Southern countryside by Jeff Forret (shelfmark: F220.A1 For.)

Beyond conflicts: cultural and religious cohabitations in Alexandria and Egypt between the 1st and the 6th century CE edited by Luca Arcar (shelfmark: BR127 Bey.)

Drawing Lithic artefacts by Yannick Raczynski-Henk (shelfmark: GN799.T6 Rac.) Continue reading

Student Research Rooms: fantastic resource for History, Classics and Archaeology

Today’s blog post is a guest post from Aimee Fletcher, SRR Co-ordinator, about the superb book collections available to staff and students from HCA in the Student Research Rooms (SRR).

At the School of History, Classics and Archaeology (HCA) we are fortunate to have our Student Research Rooms (SRR). This is a space which is not only a study space, it is also home to the School’s personal book collections. All of these collections are vast and have come from significant academic figures, personal collections which were donated to the school, and have continued to flourish thanks to the tradition of donating books.

Upper floor of Student Research Rooms, Doorway 4, Teviot Place. © Aimee Fletcher

Within some of these collections are books with have been passed down by important figures of HCA’s history at Edinburgh. Individuals such as Jim McMillan, a European historian and previous head of the School; the Sellar and Goodhart collection, which is named after two of Edinburgh’s most influential classics professors and Jim Compton whose American history collection of 2,000 books boasts some of the only known copies of certain publications of its kind in Scotland. The collections we have are unique and are looked after and made available to borrow by twenty volunteers who are found at the volunteer desk on 2M (10am-6pm, Monday-Friday).

You can find out more about the collections and the books within these from Student Research Rooms (SRR). Continue reading

New books in the Library for History, Classics and Archaeology

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester two, 2016/17 for the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

Mesopotamia: ancient art and architecture by Zainab Bahrani (shelfmark: Folio N5370 Bah.)

JFK and the masculine mystique: sex and power on the New Frontier by Steven Watts (shelfmark: HQ1090.3 Wat.)

A social history of tea: tea’s influence on commerce, culture & community by Jane Pettigrew and Bruce Richardson (shelfmark: GT2907.G7 Pet.)

The culture of clothing: dress and fashion in the ‘ancien régime’ by Daniel Roche ; translated by Jean Birrell (shelfmark: GT857 Roc.)

The topography of violence in the Greco-Roman world edited by Werner Riess and Garrett G. Faga (e-book).

Sicily: culture and conquest by Dirk Booms and Peter Higgs (shelfmark: DG865 Boo.) Continue reading

New books in the Library for History, Classics and Archaeology

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a (very) small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in semester one, 2016/17 for the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find these and more via DiscoverEd.

childrens_crusade_bookcoverFrom Constantinople to the Frontier edited by Nicholas S. M. Matheou, Theofili Kampianaki; Lorenzo M Bondioli (e-book).

Iron age hillfort defences and the tactics of sling warfare by Peter Robertson (shelfmark: GN780.22.G7 Rob.)

The Children’s Crusade: medieval history, modern mythistory by Gary Dickson (Shelfmark: D169 Dic. Also available as e-book).

Masculinity, class and same-sex desire in industrial England, 1895-1957 by Helen Smith (Shelfmark: HQ1090.7.G7 Smi.)

Classics renewed: reception and innovation in the Latin poetry of Late Antiquity edited by Scott McGill, Joseph Pucci (e-book). Continue reading

Beginner’s guide to finding a book in DiscoverEd

Got a book you need to find in the Library but not sure how to search for it in DiscoverEd? This beginner’s guide should help.

If searching for a known book use a combination of title and author keywords.

–> Search DiscoverEd

For example, if you were looking for this book:

A.A.M. Duncan, Scotland: the making of the kingdom (Edinburgh, 1992).

You could do a search using the keywords “duncan”, “Scotland”, “making” and “kingdom”. DiscoverEd will look for items that include all the keywords in the item record.

IF Continue reading

New to the Library: Samos archaeological reports

Further to a request from staff in HCA the Library is currently in the process of trying to purchase a copy of all available volumes of the Samos series of archaeological reports published by the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut.

SOMAS_inside_drawings

Samos is one of the most important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean world and this series of reports on excavations of the site provides essential data for staff and students research. Continue reading

New to the Library for History, Classics & Archaeology

Thanks to recommendations from members of staff and requests via RAB from students the Library is continually adding new books to its collections both online and in print. Here are just a small number of the books that have been added to the Library’s collections in April 2016 for the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and these demonstrate the wide range of subjects being taught, studied and researched within School.

–> Find even more via DiscoverEd.

Corrupting luxury in ancient Greek literature by Robert J. Gorman and Vanessa B. Gorman (shelfmark: PA3009 Gor.)

A medieval book of beasts: the second-family bestiary. Commentary, art, text and translation by Willene B. Clark (shelfmark: Folio PA8275.B4 Cla.)

New_books2016_bookofbeasts

“The bestiary – a book of animals, both real and mythical – is one of the most interesting and appealing medieval artefacts. The “Second-family” bestiary is the most important and frequently produced version…This study addresses the work’s purpose and audience, challenging previous assumptions with direct evidence in the manuscripts themselves”

The spoils of freedom: psychoanalysis and feminism after the fall of socialism by Renata Salecl (e-book). Continue reading